deattribution

de·at·tri·bu·tion

 (dē′ă-trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
A rejection of a previous attribution of a work of art.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metz's recent and convincing deattribution of the drawings long associated with this project has enabled him to flesh out a new and significantly different history of the church's complicated and drawn-out design and construction.
For texts of this length, that is to say, the delta test is less effective for inclusion than for exclusion, less for attribution than for deattribution. Since Marvell ranks only thirteenth and twelfth for the Fourth Advice, he is effectively excluded.
The painting was purchased by the Kroller-Muller Museum in 1972, which has made its recent deattribution particularly painful.
For a long time, scholars have assumed a connection between Defoe and Applebee, as Arthur Sherbo points out in his ODNB entry on the bookseller, because Applebee "printed four pamphlets for Defoe: two accounts of the robber John Sheppard (both in 1724), a life of the notorious criminal Jonathan Wild (1725), and another of the pirate John Gow (1725)." This would make Applebee a potentially authoritative source for Defoe--except that those four anonymous pamphlets are all expunged from the canon in Defoe DeAttributions (a fact of which Sherbo was evidently unaware when he wrote his account).