debellation


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debellation

Obsolete, the process of conquering or defeating; achieving victory.
See also: Victory
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Latin term most apropos here for describing the willful destruction of an enemy through wildly disproportionate and excessive retaliation is "debellatio" or "debellation" meaning the "defeating, or the act of conquering or subduing," literally "warring (the enemy) down", from Latin bellum "war").
In modern terms, such debellation designates the end of war caused by complete destruction of a hostile people or state, which is not what the original meaning in Latin; yet, the oroginal meaning is emphasized here, of warring or wearing the enemy down by seeking its destruction.
Canonical examples include the United States' prosecution of the war against Japan well beyond the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippines, including its systemic bombing and planned invasion of the Home Islands, or the debellation of the Third Reich.
(3) He is also remembered as an able controversialist, most notably as a result of his lengthy critiques of the ideas associated with Martin Luther and other "new men." More employed these controversialist abilities in his Apology (4) and The Debellation of Salem and Bizance, (5) in which he questioned St.
Printed in November 1533, much of More's Debellation of Salem and Bizance ("Debellation") was devoted to highlighting errors of fact and logic in Salem and Bizance.
In the end, the Debellation abstracted itself from a detailed discussion of common law versus Church law procedure and instead sought, once again, to direct the reader's attention to the wider issue at stake.
THOMAS MORE, THE DEBELLATION OF SALEM AND BIZANCE (1533) [hereinafter MORE, DEBELLATION], reprinted in 10 THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ST.
Thomas More's Debellation of Salem and Bizance and St.
Lewis as perhaps the best specimen of Platonic dialogue ever produced in English, (8) this work was followed in rapid succession by a series of polemical works in which the literary dimension is less in evidence: The Supplication of Souls (1529); The Confutation of Tyndale's Answer (1532; 1533), a massive two-part sequel to the Dialogue; The Apology of Sir Thomas More, Knight (1532); The Debellation of Salem and Bizance (1532); The Answer to a Poisoned Book (1533).
Trapp, CW 9 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979); The Debellation of Salem and Bizance, ed.