debtor


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Related to debtor: Judgment debtor

debt·or

 (dĕt′ər)
n.
1. One that owes something to another.
2. One who is guilty of a trespass or sin; a sinner.

[Middle English dettour, from Old French dettor, from Latin dēbitor, from dēbitus, past participle of dēbēre, to owe; see debt.]

debtor

(ˈdɛtə)
n
(Banking & Finance) a person or commercial enterprise that owes a financial obligation. Compare creditor

debt•or

(ˈdɛt ər)

n.
a person, company, or nation in debt or under financial obligation.
[1250–1300; Middle English detto(u)r < Old French det(t)or < Latin dēbitōrem, acc. of dēbitor <dēbi-, variant s. of dēbēre (see debt)]

debtor

Any entity (including a person, company, or government) that owes payments, financial or otherwise, to creditor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.debtor - a person who owes a creditor; someone who has the obligation of paying a debt
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
deadbeat, defaulter - someone who fails to meet a financial obligation
fly-by-night - a debtor who flees to avoid paying
mortgager, mortgagor - the person who gives a mortgage in return for money to be repaid; "we became mortgagors when the bank accepted our mortgage and loaned us the money to buy our new home"
creditor - a person to whom money is owed by a debtor; someone to whom an obligation exists

debtor

noun borrower, mortgagor, loanee, drawee For every debtor there's a creditor.
Translations
مَدين، مَدْيون
dlužník
debitorskyldner
adós
skuldunautur
dlžník
borçluborcu olan kimse

debtor

[ˈdetəʳ]
A. Ndeudor(a) m/f
B. CPD debtor nation Nnación f deudora

debtor

[ˈdɛtər] ndébiteur/trice m/fdebt relief nallègement m de la dette (du tiers-monde)debt repayment n (by individual, country)remboursement m de dette

debtor

nSchuldner(in) m(f)

debtor

[ˈdɛtəʳ] ndebitore/trice

debt

(det) noun
what one person owes to another. His debts amount to over $3,000; a debt of gratitude.
ˈdebtor noun
a person who owes a debt.
in debt
owing money.
References in classic literature ?
If a man issues more than he can redeem, the government pays his creditors in full and the debtor works out the amount upon the farms or in mines, which are all owned by the government.
The labor was performed by convicts, prisoners of war, delinquent debtors and confirmed bachelors who were too poor to pay the high celibate tax which all red-Martian governments impose.
The condemned felon has as good a yard for air and exercise in Newgate, as the insolvent debtor in the Marshalsea Prison.
How soon have those same eyes, deeply sunken in the head, glared from faces wasted with famine, and sallow from confinement, in days when it was no figure of speech to say that debtors rotted in prison, with no hope of release, and no prospect of liberty
He said that no doubt his debtor had told the truth, for he believed him to be an honest man and a good Christian, and he himself must have forgotten when and how he had given him back the crowns; and that from that time forth he would make no further demand upon him.
We sat before a little fire, with two bricks put within the rusted grate, one on each side, to prevent its burning too many coals; until another debtor, who shared the room with Mr.
Next he asked me some questions about YOU; saying that he had heard of you as a man of good principle, and that since he was unwilling to remain your debtor, would a sum of five hundred roubles repay you for all you had done for me?
This therefore he resolved to do, whatever misery it cost him, and to devote himself to her, from that great principle of justice, by which the laws of some countries oblige a debtor, who is no otherwise capable of discharging his debt, to become the slave of his creditor.
It is a very onerous business, this of being served, and the debtor naturally wishes to give you a slap.
But, whosoever goes into Marshalsea Place, turning out of Angel Court, leading to Bermondsey, will find his feet on the very paving-stones of the extinct Marshalsea jail; will see its narrow yard to the right and to the left, very little altered if at all, except that the walls were lowered when the place got free; will look upon rooms in which the debtors lived; and will stand among the crowding ghosts of many miserable years.
Those who are creditors, and those who are debtors, fall under a like discrimination.
They would be made upon the same principles that usurers commonly lend to bankrupt and fraudulent debtors, with a sparing hand and at enormous premiums.