debutant


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debutant

(ˈdɛbjʊˌtɑːnt; -ˌtænt)
n
a person who is making a first appearance in a particular capacity, such as a sportsperson playing in a first game for a team

deb•u•tant

or déb•u•tant

(ˈdɛb yʊˌtɑnt)

n.
a person who makes a debut.
[1815–25; < French débutant, present participle of débuter. See debut, -ant]
Translations
References in classic literature ?
yelled Tom, unconsciously adding to the din that seemed to pervade every part of the camp.
A maid, alarmed at the din of breaking glass, entered the room to discover what was the matter.
Then, suddenly lifting up his voice, amid the eternal din of the waters, he sang aloud: "First born of Egypt, smite did he, Of mankind, and of beast also: O, Egypt
Its ugly and spiteful little din (heard now for the first time, perhaps, since Hepzibah's periwigged predecessor had retired from trade) at once set every nerve of her body in responsive and tumultuous vibration.
Some considerating touch of humanity was in him; for at times like these, he usually abstained from patrolling the quarter-deck; because to his wearied mates, seeking repose within six inches of his ivory heel, such would have been the reverberating crack and din of that bony step, that their dreams would have been of the crunching teeth of sharks.
The vast white headless phantom floats further and further from the ship, and every rod that it so floats, what seem square roods of sharks and cubic roods of fowls, augment the murderous din.
On the other side the yard windows were thrown up, and people were shouting all sorts of things; but I kept my eye fixed on the stable door, where the smoke poured out thicker than ever, and I could see flashes of red light; presently I heard above all the stir and din a loud, clear voice, which I knew was master's:
The din of the glass crashing to the floor brought the fat Polish woman to her feet again, but another policeman came up behind her and put his knee into her back and his hands over her eyes--and then called to his companion, who went back and broke open the cash drawer and filled his pockets with the contents.
But it is not the less necessary for this; for the people must have some complicated machinery or other, and hear its din, to satisfy that idea of government which they have.
He tied some metal mugs to a dog's tail and turned him loose, and he tore around and around the place in a frenzy of fright, with all the other dogs bellowing after him and battering and crashing against everything that came in their way and making altogether a chaos of confusion and a most deafening din and turmoil; at which every man and woman of the multitude laughed till the tears flowed, and some fell out of their chairs and wallowed on the floor in ecstasy.
The instant the word was given, the two apparitions sprang forward and began to rain blows down upon each other with such lightning rapidity that I could not quite tell whether I saw the swords or only flashes they made in the air; the rattling din of these blows as they struck steel or paddings was something wonderfully stirring, and they were struck with such terrific force that I could not understand why the opposing sword was not beaten down under the assault.
Tin pans and horns were added to the din, the popula- tion massed itself and moved toward the river, met the children coming in an open carriage drawn by shouting citizens, thronged around it, joined its home- ward march, and swept magnificently up the main street roaring huzzah after huzzah!