decayed


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de·cay

 (dĭ-kā′)
v. de·cayed, de·cay·ing, de·cays
v.intr.
1. Biology To break down into component parts; rot.
2. Physics To disintegrate in a process of radioactive decay or particle decay.
3. Electronics To decrease gradually in magnitude. Used of voltage or current.
4. Aerospace To decrease in orbit. Used of an artificial satellite.
5. To fall into ruin: a civilization that had begun to decay.
6. To decline in health or vigor; waste away.
7. To decline from a state of normality, excellence, or prosperity; deteriorate.
v.tr.
To cause to decay.
n.
1.
a. The destruction or decomposition of organic matter as a result of bacterial or fungal action; rot.
b. Rotted matter.
2. Physics
3. Aerospace The decrease in orbital altitude of an artificial satellite as a result of conditions such as atmospheric drag.
4. A gradual deterioration to an inferior state: tooth decay; urban decay.
5. A falling into ruin.

[Middle English decayen, from Old French decair, from Vulgar Latin *dēcadere : Latin dē-, de- + Latin cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

de·cay′er n.
Synonyms: decay, rot, decompose, putrefy, spoil, molder, disintegrate
These verbs refer to the gradual process by which something breaks down or falls apart as a result of natural causes. Decay has wide application but often suggests partial deterioration short of complete destruction: "A decaying dam is an accident waiting to happen" (George Black).
Rot and decompose are closely synonymous with decay, but rot often emphasizes loss of structural integrity while decompose generally stresses breaking down into chemical components: The rotting timbers gave way under the added weight. When grass clippings decompose, they return nutrients to the soil.
Putrefy denotes an advanced stage of organic breakdown that is offensive to the senses: "Large numbers of cows and oxen ... were left to putrefy on mud flats after the floods receded, attracting rats" (John F. Burns).
Spoil usually refers to the process by which perishable substances become unfit for use or consumption: Fish will spoil quickly if not refrigerated.
To molder is to crumble to dust: The shawl had moldered away in the trunk.
Disintegrate refers to the reduction of something to particles, fragments, or constituent elements: The sandstone façade had disintegrated from exposure to wind and rain.

decayed

(dɪˈkeɪd)
adj
having rotted as a result of bacterial, fungal, or chemical action; decomposed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.decayed - damaged by decay; hence unsound and useless; "rotten floor boards"; "rotted beams"; "a decayed foundation"
unsound - not in good condition; damaged or decayed; "an unsound foundation"

decayed

adjective rotten, bad, decaying, wasted, spoiled, perished, festering, decomposed, corroded, unsound, putrid, putrefied, putrescent, carrion, carious Even young children have teeth so decayed they need to be extracted.
Translations

decayed

[dɪˈkeɪd] ADJ
1. [wood, food] → podrido; [tooth] → cariado
2. (fig) [family] → venido a menos

decayed

[dɪˈkeɪd] adj
(= rotten) [body, plant] → décomposé(e)
[tooth] → carié(e)

decayed

adj wood etcmorsch; toothfaul; foodschlecht; body, vegetable matterverwest

decayed

a. deteriorado-a, decaído-a; empeorado-a; cariado-a; carcomido-a; podrido-a; putrefacto-a.
References in classic literature ?
Bits of board, straw, old decayed barrels and boxes, garnished the ground in all directions; and three or four ferocious-looking dogs, roused by the sound of the wagon-wheels, came tearing out, and were with difficulty restrained from laying hold of Tom and his companions, by the effort of the ragged servants who came after them.
Many of the shells are deeply corroded, and have a much older and more decayed appearance than those at the height of 500 or 600 feet on the coast of Chile.
The Eloi, like the Carolingian kings, had decayed to a mere beautiful futility.
The railings about the plats were prostrate, decayed, or altogether gone.
But by what perversity of taste had the artist represented his principal figure as so wrinkled and decayed, while yet he had decked her out in the brightest splendor of attire, as if the loveliest maiden had suddenly withered into age, and become a moral to the beautiful around her
5% of five-year-olds surveyed in Yorkshire had decayed, missing or filled teeth, down from 33.
Dentists fill teeth by removing the decayed tooth material with a drill and replacing it with a material such as silver alloy, gold, porcelain, or composite resin.
Here scientists found a particle named Bs meson, which decayed into two muons for the first time.
Dr Anne Maguire, from the School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle University said: "At the moment only a small proportion of children in the UK receive fillings for decay in their baby teeth - or primary teeth - but what we are seeing is that having decayed teeth removed under general anaesthetic is one of the most common reasons for children to be treated in hospital in the UK.
An injection of local anaesthetic is often used to numb the area while the decayed parts of the tooth are drilled out, and the cavity is cleaned and filled to stop further decay.