deceased


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deceased

no longer living; dead
Not to be confused with:
diseased – infirm; inflicted with a disease
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

de·ceased

 (dĭ-sēst′)
adj.
No longer living; dead. See Synonyms at dead.
n. pl. deceased
A dead person.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deceased

(dɪˈsiːst)
adj
(as noun): the deceased.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•ceased

(dɪˈsist)

adj.
1. no longer living; dead.
n.
2. the deceased, a particular dead person or persons.
[1480–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

deceased

A casualty status applicable to a person who is either known to have died, determined to have died on the basis of conclusive evidence, or declared to be dead on the basis of a presumptive finding of death. The recovery of remains is not a prerequisite to determining or declaring a person deceased. See also casualty status.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deceased - someone who is no longer alivedeceased - someone who is no longer alive; "I wonder what the dead person would have done"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
dead - people who are no longer living; "they buried the dead"
infernal - an inhabitant of Hell; "his roar made the infernals quake"
living dead, zombie, zombi - a dead body that has been brought back to life by a supernatural force
Adj.1.deceased - deaddeceased - dead; "he is deceased"; "our dear departed friend"
euphemism - an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh
dead - no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life; "the nerve is dead"; "a dead pallor"; "he was marked as a dead man by the assassin"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

deceased

adjective dead, late, departed, lost, gone, expired, defunct, lifeless, pushing up daisies (informal) his recently deceased mother
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

deceased

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مَيِّت، مُتَوَفّى
zesnulý
afdød
dáinn, látinn
velionis
miris
merhumölmüşölü

deceased

[dɪˈsiːst]
A. ADJ (Jur, Police) → difunto
B. N the deceasedel/la difunto/a
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deceased

[dɪˈsiːst]
n
the deceased → le défunt (la)(e)m/f
adjdéfunt(e)
his deceased mother → sa défunte mère
his recently deceased mother
BUT sa mère décédée récemment.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

deceased

(Jur, form)
adjge- or verstorben; John Brown, deceasedder verstorbene John Brown
n the deceasedder/die Tote or Verstorbene; (pl) → die Toten or Verstorbenen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

deceased

[dɪˈsiːst] (Law) (also) (frm)
1. adjdeceduto/a
2. n the deceasedil/la defunto/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

deceased

(diˈsiːst) adjective
dead. His parents, now deceased, were very wealthy.
the deceased
in law, the dead person already mentioned, especially one who has recently died. Were you a friend of the deceased?
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

deceased

n. difunto-a, persona muerta.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deceased

adj & n difunto -ta mf
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The internal jugular vein had been cut through, with such violence, judging by the appearances, that the wound could not have been inflicted, in the act of suicide, by the hand of the deceased person.
"Sir Leicester Dedlock, Baronet, it becomes my duty to tell you that the deceased Mr.
All arrangements for the funeral had been so well attended to that had the deceased known he would doubtless have approved.
It bore no emblem of the deceased's birth or quality, for armorial bearings were then a novelty among the Norman chivalry themselves and, were totally unknown to the Saxons.
I at once examined the bedroom of the deceased which, by the advice of the doctors, had been kept locked, and was consequently exactly as it had been when the tragedy occurred.
THE sudden death of so prominent a member of the social world as the Honorable Judge Jaffrey Pyncheon created a sensation(at least, in the circles more immediately connected with the deceased) which had hardly quite subsided in a fortnight.
The Detective eagerly scanned the page, and found an official statement that the deceased was dead.
On forcing the door of the room, the deceased gentleman was discovered, dead, with the pillow of the bed over his face.
He had sanctioned his sister's proposal that the deceased lady should be laid in her mother's grave in Limmeridge churchyard.
He had gone to Joseph Alexeevich's house, on the plea of sorting the deceased's books and papers, only in search of rest from life's turmoil, for in his mind the memory of Joseph Alexeevich was connected with a world of eternal, solemn, and calm thoughts, quite contrary to the restless confusion into which he felt himself being drawn.
As the deceased had taken no further notice of his nephew in his lifetime, than sending to his eldest boy (who had been christened after him, on desperate speculation) a silver spoon in a morocco case, which, as he had not too much to eat with it, seemed a kind of satire upon his having been born without that useful article of plate in his mouth, Mr Godfrey Nickleby could, at first, scarcely believe the tidings thus conveyed to him.
The same provident care for the deceased that prevails among the hunting tribes of the prairies is observable among the piscatory tribes of the rivers and sea-coast.