decentre

(redirected from decenter)
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Related to decenter: dissenter

decentre

(diːˈsɛntə) or

decenter

vb (tr)
1. (Architecture) to take away a temporary support from
2. to deprive of a central position
Translations

decentre

decenter (US) [diːˈsentəʳ] VTdescentrar
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References in classic literature ?
later and decenter creation of the Romans, who was less like a man and
will provides scholars, activists, and students with critical tools that can help them decenter whiteness and other power structures while repositioning marginalized groups at the center of analysis.
All together, the being mode facilitates an individual's ability to decenter from dysthymic mood states and their associated rumination in order to be more fully engaged in the vibrancy of each moment.
The formative years of young adulthood are a critical period for the development of civic values and civil ideologies, a time when college-age adults need to acquire the experiences and skills to decenter and develop into civic-minded stewards of their communities.
In this sense, the ability to decenter oneself from one's internal experience seems to reflect the ability to be mindful of such experience.
Yet no attempt is made beyond these explorations to detail further how Americans might decenter their perceptions.
I further argue that the amicable relationship between the center and decenter of school structure is the best way for ensuring service delivery to the students.
These and other effects of late capitalist consumer society indeed tend to decenter literature as a genre and literary criticism as an institutional practice.
They claim that the book "draws on a certain eccentricity of expertise in an effort to decenter convention" (4) So while Sportcult draws upon a variety of disciplines, the variety effectively produces a book that seems comfortable in its disparate and decentered nature.
The poem demonstrates the persistence of categories of cultural difference even when one term of the self/other dialectic is destabilized or decentered, a useful warning for those of us who are trying to learn how to decenter ourselves.
In Saladin, we find the experiences that have done most to decenter Rushdie personally -- Saladin too is a boy of Muslim background from Bombay, who goes to school in England and embraces English ways, and then is forced to confront the racism he has carefully ignored because he worships this enticing, empowering, colonizing culture and its tantalizing dreams of fair play and justice.
If it is possible in virtual reality or cyberspace to enter an altered state, become disembodied, swap genders, create a virtual ego-center, decenter the self, and assume a different identity, then it may also be possible to assume more than one identity at the same time.