deciduousness


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de·cid·u·ous

 (dĭ-sĭj′o͞o-əs)
adj.
1. Shedding or losing foliage at the end of the growing season: deciduous trees.
2. Falling off or shed at a specific season or stage of growth: deciduous antlers; deciduous leaves.
3. Of or relating to the primary teeth.

[From Latin dēciduus, from dēcidere, to fall off : dē-, de- + cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

de·cid′u·ous·ly adv.
de·cid′u·ous·ness n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The marked deciduousness of SDTF species, make the dry season the best time for seed dispersal of anemochorous species (Luz & Nunes, 2013) such as E.
Instead, drought deciduousness is the most common way of dealing with the dry season.
However, lines 98b36-8 and 99a23-29 support option (ii), which Ferejohn would take as a "non-canonical" model of explanation: the explanans (coagulation of sap) is the essence (or rather the causal or explanatory part of the essence) of the explanandum attribute (deciduousness).
Our results corroborate this variation in the fire responses for woody species, which cannot be explained by factors such as growth form (Lamont and Downes, 2011), leaf deciduousness (Lucena et al., 2015), or seed dispersal syndromes (Lamont and Downes, 2011).
Andrade-Lima (1981) divided the Caatinga in two strata, tree stratum and shrub stratum, in which predominates, in almost all species, the deciduousness of the leaves on other forms of resistance to water stress; and a plant community moderately rich in cactuses and bromeliads added to other thorny species and several endemic ones.
Underpinning different plant strategies to cope with the dry season, the degree of deciduousness in dry forest also varies from locality to locality (Apgaua et al.
In most cases, deciduousness developed as an adaptation not to cold, but to dryness.
The deciduousness phenomenon is governed by the species occurring in each ecosystem.