deciphered


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de·ci·pher

 (dĭ-sī′fər)
tr.v. de·ci·phered, de·ci·pher·ing, de·ci·phers
1. To read or interpret (ambiguous, obscure, or illegible matter).
2. To convert from a code or cipher to plaintext; decode.

de·ci′pher·a·ble adj.
de·ci′pher·er n.
de·ci′pher·ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.deciphered - converted from cryptic to intelligible language
undeciphered - not deciphered; "Linear A is still undeciphered"
References in classic literature ?
Champollion deciphered the wrinkled granite hieroglyphics.
The left hand stumbled slowly and painfully across the paper, and it was with extreme difficulty that we deciphered the scrawl.
He wrote many more, but, as has been said, these three verses were all that could be plainly and perfectly deciphered.
My eyesight, however, was then perhaps the soundest thing about me, and in a little I had deciphered enough to guess correctly (as it proved) at the whole: -
And when one considers the variety of hands, and of bad hands too, that are to be deciphered, it increases the wonder.
Of these hairs (as I had always a mechanical genius) I likewise made a neat little purse, about five feet long, with her majesty's name deciphered in gold letters, which I gave to Glumdalclitch, by the queen's consent.
I have to say that deciphering his handwriting could be challenging at times, but once deciphered, his letters always had a flair above and beyond all other letters -- whether it was a quick congratulatory letter to an individual celebrating a birthday or some other accomplishment, or a letter admonishing someone for their inept handling of a situation that Mayor Butler considered wrong.
The document is one of the last two of the roughly 900 Dead Sea Scrolls - also known as the Qumran Scrolls for the area in the West Bank where they were discovered - that had yet to be deciphered and published.
But when it does get deciphered, it would be the first time that humans will be privy to the thoughts and conversations of a different species.
Washington, July 1 (ANI): A computer successfully deciphered an ancient language Ugaritic in just a couple of hours.
A presentation was made at the National Institutes of Health to recognize the work of Marshall Nirenberg, who along with colleagues, cracked the genetic code of living organisms and deciphered the codons for all twenty amino acids in the 1960s.
In this second edition Mr Robinson adheres to his two earlier divisions: the first looks at three famous deciphered scipts: Egyptian hieroglyphs, Linear B and the Mayan Glyphs from Central America.