decision-maker


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decision-maker

n
a person who makes decisions
Translations

decision-maker

[dɪˈsɪʒənˌmeɪkəʳ] Npersona f que toma decisiones
References in periodicals archive ?
However, evaluating health interventions only from the perspective of an individual decision-maker, interest group, or program could perpetuate inappropriate resource allocation arrangements and yield suboptimal decisions for society.
Although a client's irrational choices alone, cannot determine competence, the rehabilitation counselor should allow client autonomy during decision-maker.
Closest to rationality is attribution theory where the decision-maker is seen as a naive scientist who commits errors because he does not know better.
And while there is no question that too many bad decisions can sandbag an organization, decision leaders know that a willingness to risk a certain amount of failure is necessary if the organization and the decision-maker are to learn and move ahead.
In theory, with probability samples of this size, one can say with 95 percent certainty that the overall employee results have a sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points and the overall IT decision-maker results have a sampling error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.
In theory, with probability samples of this size, one can say with 95% certainty that the overall employee results have a sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points and the overall IT decision-maker results have a sampling error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.
If a decision-maker's interests expose it to only positive returns of the entity, the decision-maker is unlikely to be a principal.
Each stakeholder has legitimate ethical claims, and the decision-maker would do well to recognize such claims and to strive for a solution that upholds ethical principles and balances stakeholder interests.
1) Last year's IT decision-maker survey was conducted online within the United States between February 21 and February 28, 2005 among a nationwide cross sample of 354 IT decision-makers in companies with more than 100 employees, at least 1% of whom have internet access.
The major concern of this paper is predicting decision-maker momentum to change product and service offerings in response w significant uncertainties as an antecedent to organizational change.
Quality decision defenses demonstrate decision-maker cognizance to potential challenges; this generally adds to decision acceptance and agreement.

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