deckle edge


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deckle edge

n.
The rough edge of handmade paper formed in a deckle. Also called featheredge.

deck′le-edged′ (-ĕjd′) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deckle edge

n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the rough edge of handmade paper, caused by pulp seeping between the mould and the deckle: often left as ornamentation in fine books and writing papers
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a trimmed edge imitating this
ˈdeckle-ˈedged adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

deck′le edge′


n.
the irregular, untrimmed edge of handmade paper now often produced artificially on machine-made paper.
[1870–75]
deck′le-edged`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deckle edge - rough edge left by a deckle on handmade paper or produced artificially on machine-made paper
edge - a sharp side formed by the intersection of two surfaces of an object; "he rounded the edges of the box"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

deckle edge

nBüttenrand m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
As Tuttle's paintings channeled quilts and garments, Chapman's paintings evoked manuscripts: Screen-printed passages of texts and pictographs, densely pigmented oil stains, incised lines, and delicate dabs of paint scantly populated the broad white surfaces, which possessed the rough look of a deckle edge. The distribution of text riffed on the visual and topographical devices used in concrete poetry, while gestural marks and paint stains suggested the edits and drafts of a document.
(Daron Acemoy-lu and James Robinson, "Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty" (2012), Deckle Edge Publishing)
Likewise, a popular option in Eicher's Photography is to frame three 10- by 10-inch images in a slim frame, using a 2-inch-wide mat with a deckle edge.