declivity

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de·cliv·i·ty

 (dĭ-klĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. de·cliv·i·ties
A downward slope, as of a hill.

[Latin dēclīvitās, from dēclīvis, sloping down : dē-, de- + clīvus, slope; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

declivity

(dɪˈklɪvɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a downward slope, esp of the ground. Compare acclivity
[C17: from Latin dēclīvitās, from de- + clīvus a slope, hill]
deˈclivitous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•cliv•i•ty

(dɪˈklɪv ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
a downward slope (opposed to acclivity).
[1605–15; < Latin dēclīvitās a slope, hill =dēclīvi(s) sloping downward (dē- de- + -clīvis, adj. derivative of clīvus slope, hill) + -tās -ty2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.declivity - a downward slope or bend
downhill - the downward slope of a hill
incline, slope, side - an elevated geological formation; "he climbed the steep slope"; "the house was built on the side of a mountain"
steep - a steep place (as on a hill)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

declivity

noun
A downward slope or distance:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

declivity

[dɪˈklɪvɪtɪ] Ndeclive m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

declivity

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
In the hollow breast of the mountains which they were now penetrating, the surrounding heights were clothed with pine; while the declivities of the lower hills afforded abundance of bunch grass for the horses.
The rigorous winters and sultry summers, and all the capricious inequalities of temperature prevalent on the Atlantic side of the mountains, are but little felt on their western declivities. The countries between them and the Pacific are blessed with milder and steadier temperature, resembling the climates of parallel latitudes in Europe.
Along both ranges of hills, which bounded the opposite sides of the lake and valley, clouds of light vapor were rising in spiral wreaths from the uninhabited woods, looking like the smoke of hidden cottages; or rolled lazily down the declivities, to mingle with the fogs of the lower land.
What wells in Fast's resulting declivities is not rain but time.
The valley of Mayawyaw [sic] is a very broad one surrounded by steep mountains on which very few houses can be constructed, unless very distant declivities be selected.
Declivities that suggested the promise of nature's secrets were opened so she could crawl inside and look around.
Here wind deep declivities and sharp angles--ripe terrain for refuge for those on the run from authority (Jh 1:28, 3:22-26, 10:39-41; cf Mk 10:1).