deconstructionism


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Related to deconstructionism: Deconstructivist architecture

de·con·struc·tion

 (dē′kən-strŭk′shən)
n.
A philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words; and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meanings.

de′con·struc′tive adj.
de′con·struc′tion·ism n.
de′con·struc′tion·ist n. & adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deconstructionism - a philosophical theory of criticism (usually of literature or film) that seeks to expose deep-seated contradictions in a work by delving below its surface meaning
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
References in periodicals archive ?
Wesley Kort's Take, Read is a tour de force directed against the claims of post-modern deconstructionism, according to which nothing can be read as scripture.
I see no doctrinaire poststructuralist readings, no strident feminist exhortations, no hints, beyond the very subtle, of deconstructionism, no significant invoking of the French muses (except for editor Bryant).
There is one important up-to-date approach I rather miss: not any of today's silly fashions, of course (given credence by the editor even as he dismisses them), but what one might loosely call deconstructionism, the approach to evidence (especially when posthumous) with a view to discerning the construct within it.
Wilson's address was entitled, "The Map Is Not The Territory: The Future Is Not The Past." In it, he examined the basic postulate of general semantics (M does not equal T) in regards to other fields, including quantum mechanics, neurolinguistic programming, multi-culturalism, and deconstructionism.
As Derrida's deconstructionism has demonstrated - though poets and writers are always ahead of philosophers - to highlight the insignificant or the fringe or the margin naturally threatens the center, which is by definition a political act (Culler, 193-4).
She sets out her own distinctive approach by building on feminist insights drawn from deconstructionism to argue that we can challenge the constitution of meanings in criminological discourse if we recognize that meanings can change.
It is no accident that Deconstructionism emerged in the philosophy schools at the same time as received perceptions of space and time began to be dissolved by the revolutions in communications and capital flow.
Marxist aesthetics, structuralism, critical theory, deconstructionism, and postmodernism are all familiar terms in contemporary art criticism.
Aho deconstructs the jargon of deconstructionism while illustrating how such a theoretical framework can be applied to those who hate and those who work with the haters.
And you can call it historicism or deconstructionism or whatever you like, but it's all the same thing: using literature in aid of something else."
Romanticism: A Critical Reader, composed of eighteen previously published articles or extracts from books, claims to represent 'most of the movements active during the last fifteen years, including feminism, new historicism, genre theory, psychoanalysis and deconstructionism'.
Oyebode, like most of the other scholars represented in the book, remains in the peculiar position of the literary critic from a non-European background, who is trying to at once subvert and challenge western hypotheses of art and language, while using the very machinery of western discourse: the fairly politicized language of deconstructionism and discourse theory.