decorum


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de·co·rum

 (dĭ-kôr′əm)
n.
1. Appropriateness of behavior or conduct; propriety: "In the Ireland of the 1940's ... the stolidity of a long, empty, grave face was thought to be the height of decorum and profundity" (John McGahern).
2. decorums The conventions or requirements of polite behavior: the formalities and decorums of a military funeral.
3. The appropriateness of an element of an artistic or literary work, such as style or tone, to its particular circumstance or to the composition as a whole.

[Latin decōrum, from decōrus, becoming, handsome; see decorous.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

decorum

(dɪˈkɔːrəm)
n
1. propriety, esp in behaviour or conduct
2. a requirement of correct behaviour in polite society
[C16: from Latin: propriety]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•co•rum

(dɪˈkɔr əm, -ˈkoʊr-)

n.
1. dignified propriety of conduct, manners, or appearance.
2. Usu., decorums. the customs and observances of polite society.
[1560–70; < Latin decōrum, decorous]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

decorum

proper behavior; action that is seemly and in good taste. — decorous, adj.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Decorum

 of deans: deans collectively. See also decanter.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.decorum - propriety in manners and conduct
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
becomingness - the quality of being becoming
indecorousness, indecorum - a lack of decorum
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

decorum

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

decorum

noun
1. Conformity to recognized standards, as of conduct or appearance:
2. Socially correct behavior:
etiquette, good form, manner (used in plural), mores, propriety (also used in plural), p's and q's.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حِشْمَه، لَياقَه، ذَوْق
dobré způsoby
anstændighedetikette
tisztesség
háttprÿîi

decorum

[dɪˈkɔːrəm] Ndecoro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

decorum

[dɪˈkɔːrəm] ndécorum m, bienséance f
sense of decorum → sens m des convenances
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

decorum

nAnstand m, → Dekorum nt (old, form); to have a sense of decorumGefühl für Anstand haben; to behave with decorumsich mit gebührendem Anstand benehmen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

decorum

[dɪˈkɔːrəm] ndecoro
out of a sense of decorum → per rispetto delle convenienze
a breach of decorum → una sconvenienza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

decorous

(ˈdekərəs) adjective
(behaving in a manner which is) acceptable, especially quiet and dignified. behaving in a decorous manner.
ˈdecorously adverb
decorum (diˈkoːrəm) noun
quiet, dignified and proper behaviour. The man behaved with decorum in the old lady's presence.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Let this, my young readers, be your constant maxim, that no man can be good enough to enable him to neglect the rules of prudence; nor will Virtue herself look beautiful, unless she be bedecked with the outward ornaments of decency and decorum. And this precept, my worthy disciples, if you read with due attention, you will, I hope, find sufficiently enforced by examples in the following pages.
To solve this question, Mr Swiveller summoned the handmaid and ascertained that Miss Sophy Wackles had indeed left the letter with her own hands; and that she had come accompanied, for decorum's sake no doubt, by a younger Miss Wackles; and that on learning that Mr Swiveller was at home and being requested to walk upstairs, she was extremely shocked and professed that she would rather die.
Meanwhile the younger generation: Boris, the officer, Anna Mikhaylovna's son; Nicholas, the undergraduate, the count's eldest son; Sonya, the count's fifteen-year-old niece, and little Petya, his youngest boy, had all settled down in the drawing room and were obviously trying to restrain within the bounds of decorum the excitement and mirth that shone in all their faces.
Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, "Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven, Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore -- Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!" Quoth the raven "Nevermore."
Then the ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, "Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven, Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore-- Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!" Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."
She held their weakness for lions in good-humoured contempt, but played to them her part of the distinguished woman of letters with decorum.
"That you may know that since you have not carried out my wishes in regard to observing outward decorum, I will take measures to put an end to this state of things."
"True, to see real acting, good hardened real acting; but I would hardly walk from this room to the next to look at the raw efforts of those who have not been bred to the trade: a set of gentlemen and ladies, who have all the disadvantages of education and decorum to struggle through."
Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum. It was an unsuitable connexion, and did not produce much happiness.
It is a curious thing, by the bye, for which I am quite unable to account, that these weird creatures-- the females, I mean--had in the earlier days of my stay an instinctive sense of their own repulsive clumsiness, and displayed in consequence a more than human regard for the decency and decorum of extensive costume.
Collins's fancying herself in love with her friend had once occurred to Elizabeth within the last day or two; but that Charlotte could encourage him seemed almost as far from possibility as she could encourage him herself, and her astonishment was consequently so great as to overcome at first the bounds of decorum, and she could not help crying out:
The leaders, of course, observed a due decorum, but some of the subalterns could not restrain their chuckling exultation, boasting that they would soon plant the British standard on the walls of Astoria, and drive the Americans out of the country.