decreasing


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de·crease

 (dĭ-krēs′)
intr. & tr.v. de·creased, de·creas·ing, de·creas·es
To become or cause to become less or smaller, as in number, amount, or intensity.
n. (dē′krēs′)
1. The act or process of decreasing.
2. The amount by which something decreases.

[Middle English decresen, from Old French decreistre, decreiss-, from Latin dēcrēscere : dē-, de- + crēscere, to grow; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

de·creas′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: decrease, lessen, reduce, dwindle, abate, diminish, subside
These verbs mean to become smaller or less or to cause something to become smaller or less. Decrease and lessen have the most general application: saw the plane descend as its speed decreased; vowed to decrease government spending; an appetite that lessened as the disease progressed; restrictions aimed at lessening the environmental impact of off-road vehicles.
Reduce often emphasizes bringing down in size, degree, or intensity: reduced the heat once the mixture reached a boil; workers who refused to reduce their wage demands.
Dwindle suggests decreasing bit by bit to a vanishing point: savings that dwindled away in retirement.
Abate stresses a decrease in amount or intensity and suggests a reduction of excess: a blustery wind that abated toward evening; increased the dosage in an effort to abate the pain.
Diminish stresses the idea of loss or depletion: a breeze that arose as daylight diminished; a scandal that diminished the administration's authority.
Subside implies a falling away to a more normal level or state: floodwaters that did not subside until days after the storm passed; anger that subsided with understanding.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.decreasing - becoming less or smaller
increasing - becoming greater or larger; "increasing prices"
2.decreasing - music
increasing - music
Translations

decreasing

[diːˈkriːsɪŋ] ADJdecreciente

decreasing

[diːˈkriːsɪŋ] adj [number, rate, demand] → en voie de diminution

decreasing

[diːˈkriːsɪŋ] adjin diminuzione

decreasing

a. decreciente, disminuyendo.
References in classic literature ?
When we travel southward and see a species decreasing in numbers, we may feel sure that the cause lies quite as much in other species being favoured, as in this one being hurt.
If the shot should preserve continuously its initial velocity of 12,000 yards per second, it would require little more than nine hours to reach its destination; but, inasmuch as that initial velocity will be continually decreasing, it will occupy 300,000 seconds, that is 83hrs.
His daughter attended him with the greatest tenderness, but she saw with despair that their little fund was rapidly decreasing and that there was no other prospect of support.
For weeks, possibly months, their presence might cause ever decreasing suspicion among others of the tribe; but eventually they would become as born brothers to these strange apes.
Its weight was ever decreasing, and would be entirely annihilated on that line where the lunar and terrestrial attractions would neutralize each other.
Having exhausted the resources of Riverboro and its immediate vicinity, the unfortunate couple had moved on and on in a steadily decreasing scale of prosperity until they had reached Temperance, where they had settled down and invited fate to do its worst, an invitation which was promptly accepted.