decreet

decreet

(dɪˈkriːt)
n
(Law) Scots law the final judgment or sentence of a court
[C14: decret, from Old French, from Latin dēcrētum decree]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Con el "Decreet houdende de erkenning van de Vlaamse Gebarentaal" (Decreto sobre el reconocimiento de la lengua de signos flamenca) el Parlamento Flamenco Paises Bajos reconoce que la lengua de signos flamenca es el idioma de la comunidad sorda de Flandes, acepta la existencia de esta lengua en el dominio judicial y lo trata en consecuencia y expresa su respeto por este lenguaje.
In contrast to a process resolved against the defendant, in the case of a "decreet absolvitor" in which the defendant wins, a court would allow a new action when new evidence became available or new law was relevant.
(232.) CODIFICATIE van 11 oktober 2013 VAN DE DECRETALE BEPALINGEN BETREFFENDE HET HOGER ONDERWIJS [CODEX HOGER ONDERWIJS], as endorsed by Decreet tot bekrachtiging van de decretale bepalingen betreffende het HOGER ONDERWIJS, gecodificeerd op 11 oktober 2013 (1), Dec.
In Flanders (the northern region of Belgium), for example, a Decree on Integration was passed by Parliament in June 2013 (Decreet betreffende het Vlaamse integratie- en inburgeringsbeleid, 2013).
(26) Memorie van Toelichting [Explanatory Memorandum], Ontwerp van Decreet betreffende de radio-omroep en televisie, Parl.
8:1) even though the completely Scots forms decreet and glore exist [...] Waddell's orthography was far more English than that of some contemporaries, and one is tempted to see it as a continuation of the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century school of a single written standard intended for divergent Scots and English realisations, something that had become increasingly problematic given the growing awareness of a linguistic continuum between the two after the Union of the Parliaments and the spread of prescriptive approaches to diction towards the end of that century.
An Act was finally passed in 1600 forbidding the marriage of the guilty party to the person he or she was guilty with (as named in the decreet).
For a woman this would normally be a third of his moveable estate and of the life-rent of his heritable estate if there were children, or one half of the estate and a third life rent if there were no children, as well as anything written into the marriage contract.(9) The innocent party was free to remarry anyone, while the guilty party could remarry but not the person named in the decreet. Successful women pursuers could also claim the expenses of the case on top of everything else they were awarded out of their husband's estate or effects.
On top of the other expenses of the case was the expense of "extracting" the decreet. This too depended on the complexity of the case, for an extracted decreet, i.e.