decreolization


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de·cre·o·li·za·tion

 (dē-krē′ə-lĭ-zā′shən)
n.
The loss of creole features in an original creole language as the result of contact with a language that was one of its ancestors.

de·cre′o·lize′ (-ə-līz′) v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three linguistic contributions on Guyanese are included: Alim Hosein treats reduplication and shows that the classic decreolization hypothesis does not hold; Walter F.
necessarily had to go through the stages of pidginisation, creolisation and decreolization" (2013: 142).
Bonvini and Petter (1998:79) note that these studies tend to focus on two features: the lexical component of Brazilian Portuguese and the phonological and morphosyntactic characteristics of Brazilian Portuguese vernacular (BPV) through possible creolization, semi-creolization, or decreolization. But African languages and subsequent varieties that have persisted in Brazil have not been the focus of much research.
A Discussion of Second Language Acquisition and Decreolization. In Pidginization and Creolization as Language Acquisition, ed.
Nevertheless, decreolization does not have to be feared since structural implications of the switches do not seem to be an issue so far (if we judge from our own recent still unpublished studies on code switching).
Sharif themselves remark that "linguistic evidence for this genesis of Swahili is not easy to find" and that "the process of decreolization tends to obliterate the peculiar features of pidgins and creoles" (1994 : 67).
xiv) and to challenge the linguistic continuum theory (Gibson cites Bickerton and Rickford in particular) that "assumes that everyone in the community will eventually speak English by gradually changing the Creole grammar towards English in a process known as decreolization" (p.
Basilectal creole, decreolization, and autonomous language change in St Kitts-Nevis.