decrepitude


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de·crep·i·tude

 (dĭ-krĕp′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
The quality or condition of being weakened, worn out, impaired, or broken down by old age, illness, or hard use.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

de•crep•i•tude

(dɪˈkrɛp ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
decrepit condition; dilapidation; feebleness.
[1595–1605; < French]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.decrepitude - a state of deterioration due to old age or long use
deterioration, impairment - a symptom of reduced quality or strength
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

decrepitude

noun
1. decay, deterioration, degeneration, dilapidation The buildings had been allowed to fall into decrepitude.
2. weakness, old age, incapacity, wasting, invalidity, senility, infirmity, dotage, debility, feebleness, eld (archaic) the boundary between healthy middle age and total decrepitude
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

decrepitude

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

decrepitude

[dɪˈkrepɪtjuːd] N [of person] → decrepitud f; [of building] → deterioro m, mal estado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

decrepitude

[dɪˈkrɛpɪtjuːd] n [person] → décrépitude f; [building] → délabrement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

decrepitude

n (of staircase, car etc)Altersschwäche f; (of building)Baufälligkeit f; (of person)Altersschwäche f, → Klapprigkeit f (inf); (of industry)heruntergekommener Zustand
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

decrepitude

[dɪˈkrɛpɪtjuːd] n (frm) → decrepitezza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

decrepitude

n. decrepitud.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"And then," resumed D'Artagnan, "to this decrepitude is probably added poverty, for he must have neglected the little that he had, and the dirty scoundrel, Grimaud, more taciturn than ever and still more drunken than his master -- stay, Planchet, it breaks my heart to merely think of it."
As he drew near the advancing soldiers, and as the roll of their drum came full upon his ears, the old man raised himself to a loftier mien, while the decrepitude of age seemed to fall from his shoulders, leaving him in gray but unbroken dignity.
Despite his sixty years and snow-white hair, his hand-shake was firmly hearty, and he showed no signs of decrepitude, walking with a quick, snappy step, making all movements definitely and decisively.
The Jew stepped back in this emergency, with more agility than could have been anticipated in a man of his apparent decrepitude; and, seizing up the pot, prepared to hurl it at his assailant's head.
When it was discovered that the knacker and tanner would give only a very few shillings for Prince's carcase because of his decrepitude, Durbeyfield rose to the occasion.
His uncle had deceived him, and might he not consign her to some miserable place where her youth and beauty would prove a far greater curse than ugliness and decrepitude? To a caged man, bound hand and foot, this was a terrible idea--but no, he thought, his mother was by; there was the portrait-painter, too--simple enough, but still living in the world, and of it.
Now, the bad child having been strictly charged by his parent to remain at home in her absence, of course went out; and, being in the very last stage of mental decrepitude, went out with two objects; firstly, to establish a claim he conceived himself to have upon any licensed victualler living, to be supplied with threepennyworth of rum for nothing; and secondly, to bestow some maudlin remorse on Mr Eugene Wrayburn, and see what profit came of it.
His slow, limping step and bowed shoulders gave the appearance of decrepitude, and yet his hard, deep-lined, craggy features, and his enormous limbs showed that he was possessed of unusual strength of body and of character.
Ces sites religieux et monuments historiques de la vallee du M'zab, classee patrimoine universel en 1982 par l'Unesco, ont connu un processus de degradation et de decrepitude du fait des [beaucoup moins que] aleas du temps [beaucoup plus grand que] et necessitent une revitalisation et un confortement afin de renforcer la position touristique et culturelle du M'zab a l'echelle internationale, dans le strict respect de l'environnement, a-t-il souligne.
She's four months younger than me - a fact she rarely misses an opportunity to reveal - so we toasted her creeping decrepitude with a few glasses.
In England now, as wrinklies sit in flats awaiting the grim reaper, we are to be allotted a variable living allowance (depending on one's decrepitude).
Inside Rao Raj Vilas, which has been retrieved from complete decrepitude by the present generation of Ramdhan Singh's descendants and the charming elder daughter- in- law, Charu Singh, who studied Economics at LSR before marrying ex- Ranbaxy executive Anant Singh, who wears the interchangeable hats of receptionist, cashier and general manager.