decrepit

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de·crep·it

 (dĭ-krĕp′ĭt)
adj.
Weakened, worn out, impaired, or broken down by old age, illness, or hard use. See Synonyms at weak.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dēcrepitus, worn out, feeble : dē-, de- + crepitus, past participle of crepāre, to burst, crack.]

de·crep′it·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

decrepit

(dɪˈkrɛpɪt)
adj
1. enfeebled by old age; infirm
2. broken down or worn out by hard or long use; dilapidated
[C15: from Latin dēcrepitus, from crepāre to creak]
deˈcrepitly adv
deˈcrepiˌtude, deˈcrepitness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•crep•it

(dɪˈkrɛp ɪt)

adj.
1. weakened by old age; feeble; infirm.
2. worn out or broken down by long use; dilapidated.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin dēcrepitus=dē- de- + -crepitus, akin to crepāre to crack, burst]
de•crep′it•ly, adv.
de•crep′it•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.decrepit - worn and broken down by hard use; "a creaky shack"; "a decrepit bus...its seats held together with friction tape"; "a flea-bitten sofa"; "a run-down neighborhood"; "a woebegone old shack"
worn - affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
2.decrepit - lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality; "a feeble old woman"; "her body looked sapless"
frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

decrepit

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

decrepit

adjective
2. Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

decrepit

[dɪˈkrepɪt] ADJ [person] → decrépito; [building] → deteriorado, en mal estado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

decrepit

[dɪˈkrɛpɪt] adj [person] → décrépit(e); [building] → délabré(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

decrepit

adj staircase, car etcaltersschwach; buildingbaufällig, heruntergekommen; industryheruntergekommen; personalterschwach, klapprig (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

decrepit

[dɪˈkrɛpɪt] adj (building) → cadente; (person) → decrepito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

decrepit

a. decrépito-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"And then," resumed D'Artagnan, "to this decrepitude is probably added poverty, for he must have neglected the little that he had, and the dirty scoundrel, Grimaud, more taciturn than ever and still more drunken than his master -- stay, Planchet, it breaks my heart to merely think of it."
As he drew near the advancing soldiers, and as the roll of their drum came full upon his ears, the old man raised himself to a loftier mien, while the decrepitude of age seemed to fall from his shoulders, leaving him in gray but unbroken dignity.
Despite his sixty years and snow-white hair, his hand-shake was firmly hearty, and he showed no signs of decrepitude, walking with a quick, snappy step, making all movements definitely and decisively.