decumbent

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Related to decumbency: incumbency

de·cum·bent

 (dĭ-kŭm′bənt)
adj.
1. Lying down; reclining.
2. Botany Lying or growing on the ground but with erect or rising tips: decumbent stems.

[Latin dēcumbēns, dēcumbent-, present participle of dēcumbere, to lie down : dē-, de- + -cumbere, to lie down.]

de·cum′bence (-bəns), de·cum′ben·cy (-bən-sē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

decumbent

(dɪˈkʌmbənt)
adj
1. lying down or lying flat
2. (Botany) botany (of certain stems) lying flat with the tip growing upwards
[C17: from Latin dēcumbēns, present participle of dēcumbere to lie down]
deˈcumbence, deˈcumbency n
deˈcumbently adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•cum•bent

(dɪˈkʌm bənt)

adj.
1. lying on the ground with the extremity tending to rise: decumbent stems.
2. recumbent.
[1635–45; < Latin dēcumbent-, s. of dēcumbēns, present participle of dēcumbere=- de- + -cumbere; see recumbent]
de•cum′bence, de•cum′ben•cy, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.decumbent - lying downdecumbent - lying down; in a position of comfort or rest
unerect - not upright in position or posture
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

decumbent

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other structure had a rounder shape measuring approximately 2.7x2.6cm, with variable topography when the animal was repositioned for better exposure (still in dorsal decumbency), occupying the left lateral abdominal area superimposed to the first described structure or superimposed to the vertebral column at the thoracolumbar transition (Figure 1A and B).
Infected animals develop tremors and incoordination that progress to decumbency and death.
Rostrocaudal projection was chosen to observe the foramen magnum, with the animal in dorsal decumbency, a vertical X-ray beam and with the zigomatic arch with an angle from 45[degrees] to 75[degrees] to the table.