dedicant

dedicant

(ˈdɛdɪkənt)
n
a person who devotes or dedicates
References in periodicals archive ?
As the inscription on its back pillar reveals, the dedicant is General Psamtik, the Governor of Upper Egypt based at Elephantine, Aswan.
ADF encourages its members to read and research as much as they can about Druidry before embarking into the ADF Druid initiation program, which is known as The Dedicant's Path.
Both alternatives point in the same direction: the dedicant of this striking artefact saw Demeter in the form of a beautiful woman enfolded in light at some climactic point during the secret ceremony.
These steles are representative of a type that is found throughout North Africa and present the dedicant in an architectural relationship to the goddess Caelestis.
The dedicatory inscriptions preserved on some of the furniture found in sanctuaries are generally fragmentary and provide no information other than the name of the dedicant. For the majority of furniture listed in the temple inventories no names at all are recorded, a fact that might suggest that not all were dedications in the first place.
The process is also evident in the nomenclature of the dedicant recorded on a neo-Punic dedication from Lepcis to another Punic god, El Qone Aras: "To the Lord El, master [or creator] of the earth, Candidus, son of Candidus, son of Hanno, son of Bodmelqart, has built and consecrated this exedra and this portico at his own expense, because he [El] has heard his voice and blessed him." Here Candidus's father, obviously a man of native stock, had either been given a Latin name by his father or assumed it himself, and handed it on to his son.
2.31.13-14) to some extent invited an allegorical reading in the light of the alleged salvation and vengeance achieved at Actium by the shrine's dedicant three years before its inauguration.(21) Long before Actium, Apollo had triumphal associations in Rome,(22) which Octavian no doubt evoked by erecting his new temple in the vicinity of Victoria's temple on the Palatine.(23)
Now, the dedicant of a temple must be free of all connection with grief or mourning.
'ps'n, "le dedicant porte un nom libyque termine en -san," supported by the photograph (HNPI...]n); cf.
(33) Both inscriptions--and others like them--follow the same basic order: the divine recipient of the vow is mentioned first, followed by a verb or verb phrase containing ndr, the name of the dedicant, and the motivation clause.