deductible


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Related to deductible: Tax deductible

de·duct·i·ble

 (dĭ-dŭk′tə-bəl)
adj.
That can be deducted, especially with respect to income taxes: deductible expenses.
n.
1. Something, such as an expense, that can be deducted, as for income-tax purposes.
2.
a. A clause in an insurance policy that exempts the insurer from paying an initial specified amount in the event that the insured sustains a loss or must pay for services otherwise covered under the policy.
b. The specified amount that must be paid by the holder of such a policy.

de·duct′i·bil′i·ty n.

deductible

(dɪˈdʌktɪbəl)
adj
1. (Mathematics) capable of being deducted
2. (Accounting & Book-keeping) US and Canadian short for tax-deductible
n
(Insurance) insurance US and Canadian a specified contribution towards the cost of a claim, stipulated on certain insurance policies as being payable by the policyholder. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): excess
deˌductiˈbility n

de•duct•i•ble

(dɪˈdʌk tə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being deducted.
2. allowable as a tax deduction.
n.
3. the amount for which the insured is liable on each claim made on an insurance policy.
[1855–60]
de•duct`i•bil′i•ty, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deductible - (taxes) an amount that can be deducted (especially for the purposes of calculating income tax)
revenue enhancement, tax, taxation - charge against a citizen's person or property or activity for the support of government
amount, amount of money, sum, sum of money - a quantity of money; "he borrowed a large sum"; "the amount he had in cash was insufficient"
2.deductible - a clause in an insurance policy that relieves the insurer of responsibility to pay the initial loss up to a stated amount
clause, article - a separate section of a legal document (as a statute or contract or will)
Adj.1.deductible - acceptable as a deduction (especially as a tax deduction)
revenue enhancement, tax, taxation - charge against a citizen's person or property or activity for the support of government
nondeductible - not allowable as a deduction
Translations

deductible

[dɪˈdʌktəbl] ADJdeducible, descontable; (for tax purposes) → desgravable, deducible

deductible

adjabziehbar; (= tax deductible)absetzbar

deductible

[dɪˈdʌktəbl] adjdeducibile

de·duc·ti·ble

a. deducible.

deductible

n (insurance) deducible m, franquicia (esp. Esp); to reach your deductible..alcanzar el deducible (la franquicia)
References in periodicals archive ?
The issue on this appeal to the Second Circuit is whether investment advice fees inurred by a trust (T) are fully deductible in calculating adjusted gross income (AGI) under Sec.
Other coworkers believe that only one deductible should apply because it is only one occurrence.
If the client itemizes deductions, paying down a loan with deductible interest provides a risk-free rate of return effectively equal to the loan's interest rate minus the marginal rate of tax savings forgone.
Yoder, 55, who belongs to the practice's CDHP, used none of his deductible the first year but had to dip into his HSA the second year to pay for a physical and a colonoscopy.
One aspect of the new scheme is that the insured can choose to have a deductible. (1) One of the issues related to the practical implementation of a voluntary deductible is whether the premium rebate should be community rated or risk rated.
Insured has a covered loss to which we have applied the $1,000 deductible. However, the agent is contesting application of the deductible stating only the 72-hour waiting period should apply as a deduction.
Americans with health coverage through their employers aren't the only ones facing higher deductibles. Chattanooga Times Free Press columnist Clint Cooper, citing a 2015 HealthPocket study, wrote on September 23, "The average deductible for a single person enrolled in the ACA's bronze plan--its cheapest--is $5,181, while the average deductible for a family in the same plan is $10,545.
A majority of silver plans pay for ordinary in-network sick care before an enrollee has met the deductible.
Specifically, Kaiser said, less than two-thirds (63 percent) of non-elderly households with incomes above the federal poverty level have sufficient liquid financial assets to cover a midrange annual deductible of $1,200 for an individual or $2,400 for a family.
Sandy, which is now ranked as the second most expensive storm to strike the, showed how tricky applying a deductible can be.
"This particular policy fills a gap for the insured by covering 100 percent of the deductible if the damage exceeds the deductible dollar amount," he said.
Most negotiations in the last five to 10 years between employee and employer have focused significantly on the insurance plan design, which includes deductibles, co-pays, and a little less flexibility in selecting doctors by providing incentives to employees to go to doctors and service providers who have agreed to discount fees.