deer tick


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

deer tick

n.
Either of two North American ticks (Ixodes scapularis or I. pacificus) that are parasitic on deer and other animals and transmit the infectious agents of certain febrile diseases, such as Lyme disease. Also called black-legged tick.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deer tick - a northeastern tick now recognized as same species as Ixodes scapularis
hard tick, ixodid - ticks having a hard shield on the back and mouth parts that project from the head
genus Ixodes, Ixodes - type genus of the family Ixodidae
Translations
Hirschzecke

deer tick

n. garrapata del venado, agente causante de la enfermedad de Lyme.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ian Stein's left leg became very red days more than a week after he had removed the deer tick from the back of his left knee.
In the eastern half of the United States, the bacterium is carried by the blacklegged tick, also known as the deer tick. On the Pacific coast, the disease is spread by the western blacklegged tick.
In fact Joanne, whose children were six, nine and 13, had been infected with Lyme disease, a bacterial illness spread by the bloodsucking deer tick, which is about the size of a poppy seed.
burgdorferi: Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the cause of human granulocytic anaplasmosis; Babesia microti; Borrelia miyamotoi; and the deer tick virus subtype of Powassan virus (POWV) (4-9).
For instance, the Ixodes scapularis, or deer tick, which is the primary source of Lyme disease in the northeastern U.S., had been detected in nearly 50% more counties by 2015 than was previously reported in 1996.
For a decade Nicholas Ogden, a researcher at the National Microbiology Laboratory of the Public Health Agency of Canada, has tracked the northern expansion of the deer tick (Ixodes scapularis), the vector for Lyme disease.
Lyme is a multisystem inflammatory disease that is transmitted to humans and pets through the bite of a deer tick. It is commonly associated with a characteristic local bulls-eye rash, but symptoms can eventually spread throughout the body to the joints, nervous systems, and other organs.
But scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Mayo Clinic have discovered that a second, related species of bacteria, Borrelia mayortii, can infect people who have been bitten by the blacklegged deer tick.
By 1921, he suggested that the disease might be transmitted by the Ixodes scapularis tick, better known as the deer tick.
Many people who are infected with it never know they have been bitten by the tiny deer tick that spreads the bacterium from animals to people.
Scientists predict that Lyme disease will continue to spread as climate change causes an increase in the humid summer conditions and mild fall weather favored by the tiny blacklegged deer tick, which is the most common transmitter of Lyme disease.
Of particular concern is the deer tick (Ixodes scapularis), which is host to at least five potentially dangerous pathogens including Borrelia burgdorferi, Babesia microti, Anaplasma phagocytophilium, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Deer Tick Virus.