defamatory

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def·a·ma·tion

 (dĕf′ə-mā′shən)
n.
The act of defaming; calumny, slander, or libel.

de·fam′a·to′ry (dĭ-făm′ə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

defamatory

(dɪˈfæmətərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
(Law) injurious to someone's name or reputation
deˈfamatorily adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.defamatory - (used of statements) harmful and often untrue; tending to discredit or malign
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

defamatory

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

defamatory

adjective
Damaging to the reputation:
Law: libelous.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

defamatory

[dɪˈfæmətərɪ] ADJ [article, statement] → difamatorio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

defamatory

[dɪˈfæmətəri] adj [article, statement, remark] → diffamant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

defamatory

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

defamatory

[dɪˈfæmətrɪ] adj (frm) → diffamatorio/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
way that they can be read defamatorily, the site loses Section 230
Aware that everything he writes will be checked and double-checked by those seeking to belittle it--former Quadrant editor Robert Manne even, recklessly and defamatorily enough, accused him of plagiarism (9)--Mr.
Rawson's solicitor, Dr William Mike Ramsden of Whitehead Woodward and Co, told us in a letter marked "urgent" that our account of his client's behaviour was "defamatorily" - a word not in the dictionary - and that Rawson "has suffered substantial loss".