defective

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de·fec·tive

 (dĭ-fĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Having or showing a defect; faulty: a defective appliance.
2. Grammar Lacking one or more of the inflected forms normal for a particular category of word, as the verb may in English.
n. Offensive
One who has a physical or mental disability.

de·fec′tive·ly adv.
de·fec′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

defective

(dɪˈfɛktɪv)
adj
1. having a defect or flaw; imperfect; faulty
2. (of a person) below the usual standard or level, esp in intelligence
3. (Linguistics) grammar (of a word) lacking the full range of inflections characteristic of its form class, as for example must, which has no past tense
deˈfectively adv
deˈfectiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•fec•tive

(dɪˈfɛk tɪv)

adj.
1. faulty.
2. subnormal in intelligence or behavior.
3. lacking one or more of the inflected forms common to most words of the same class in a language, as must, which occurs only in the present tense.
n.
4. a defective person or thing.
[1375–1425; Middle English < Middle French < Late Latin]
de•fec′tive•ly, adv.
de•fec′tive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.defective - having a defect; "I returned the appliance because it was defective"
imperfect - not perfect; defective or inadequate; "had only an imperfect understanding of his responsibilities"; "imperfect mortals"; "drainage here is imperfect"
2.defective - markedly subnormal in structure or function or intelligence or behavior; "defective speech"
abnormal, unnatural - not normal; not typical or usual or regular or conforming to a norm; "abnormal powers of concentration"; "abnormal amounts of rain"; "abnormal circumstances"; "an abnormal interest in food"
3.defective - not working properlydefective - not working properly; "a bad telephone connection"; "a defective appliance"
malfunctioning, nonfunctional - not performing or able to perform its regular function; "a malfunctioning valve"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

defective

adjective
1. faulty, broken, not working, flawed, imperfect, out of order, on the blink (slang) Retailers can return defective merchandise.
faulty working, whole, perfect, intact
2. deficient, lacking, short, inadequate, insufficient, incomplete, scant food which is defective in nutritional quality
deficient adequate
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

defective

adjective
1. Having a defect or defects:
2. Lacking an essential element:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
ناقِص، فيهِ عَيْب
kazovývadnýzávadný
defektfejlbehæftet
gallaîur; afbrigîilegur
bozukkusurlu

defective

[dɪˈfektɪv]
A. ADJdefectuoso
defective verb (Ling) → verbo m defectivo
to be defective in sth [person] → ser deficiente en algo
B. N
1. (= person) → persona f anormal
mental defectivedeficiente mf mental
2. (Gram) → defectivo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

defective

[dɪˈfɛktɪv] adj
(= faulty) [brakes, part, merchandise] → défectueux/euse
(= weak) [sight, immune system] → déficient(e)
to become defective → devenir déficient(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

defective

adj
material, goods etcfehlerhaft; machine, genedefekt; (fig) reasoning etcfehlerhaft; hearing, sightmangelhaft, gestört; he has a defective heart valveer hat einen Herzklappenfehler
(mentally) defectivegeistesgestört
n
(Gram) → Defektivum nt
(= retarded person)Geistesgestörte(r) mf
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

defective

[dɪˈfɛktɪv] adj (machine, workmanship, eyesight) → difettoso/a; (system, reasoning) → cattivo/a (Gram) → difettivo/a
to be defective in sth → mancare di qc
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

defect

(ˈdiːfekt) noun
a fault or flaw. It was a basic defect in her character; a defect in the china.
(diˈfekt) verb
to leave a country, political party etc to go and join another; to desert. He defected to the West.
deˈfection (-ʃən) noun
(an act of) desertion.
deˈfective (-tiv) adjective
having a fault or flaw. a defective machine; He is mentally defective.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

de·fec·tive

a. defectuoso-a; incompleto-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Some praises proceed merely of flattery; and if he be an ordinary flatterer, he will have certain common attributes, which may serve every man; if he be a cunning flatterer, he will follow the archflatterer, which is a man's self; and wherein a man thinketh best of himself, therein the flatterer will uphold him most: but if he be an impudent flatterer, look wherein a man is conscious to himself, that he is most defective, and is most out of countenance in himself, that will the flatterer entitle him to perforce, spreta conscientia.
Now the general is the bulwark of the State; if the bulwark is complete at all points; the State will be strong; if the bulwark is defective, the State will be weak.
Now we see that governments differ from each other in their form, and that some of them are defective, others [1275b] as excellent as possible: for it is evident, that those which have many deficiencies and degeneracies in them must be far inferior to those which are without such faults.