defenestration


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de·fen·es·tra·tion

 (dē-fĕn′ĭ-strā′shən)
n.
An act of throwing someone or something out of a window.

[From de- + Latin fenestra, window.]

defenestration

(diːˌfɛnɪˈstreɪʃən)
n
the act of throwing someone out of a window
[C17: from New Latin dēfenestrātiō, from Latin de- + fenestra window]

de•fen•es•tra•tion

(diˌfɛn əˈstreɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of throwing a person or thing out of a window.
[1610–20; de- + Latin fenestr(a) window + -ation]
de•fen′es•trate`, v.t. -trat•ed, -trat•ing.

defenestration

the act of hurling from a window, especially people.
See also: Killing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defenestration - the act of throwing someone or something out of a windowdefenestration - the act of throwing someone or something out of a window
expulsion, riddance, ejection, exclusion - the act of forcing out someone or something; "the ejection of troublemakers by the police"; "the child's expulsion from school"
Translations
DefenstrationFenstersturz
defenestracja
defenestração

defenestration

n (form, hum)Fenstersturz m; the Defenestration of Pragueder Prager Fenstersturz
References in periodicals archive ?
Defenestration and Deviation, two FTC teams featuring District 203 and 204 middle schoolers and high school students, also will be at the Demo with smaller, 18- by 18- by 18-inch robots that can be driven around.
DEPUTY HEADS ROLL AT M&S It's back to square one for Steve Rowe, Marks & Spencer chief executive, who has inherited the leadership of its clothing business for the second time following yesterday's defenestration of Jill McDonald.
Hence the defenestration of May and the search for a new leader who can somehow make the delivery before the party has to face the voters again.
WHEN the Brexit saga comes to be written - on the assumption that it will ever end - the past week will have a chapter of its own: | the defenestration of a tearful Theresa May and the launch of yet another Tory beauty parade; | a crowing victory parade by the Farageists and the utter humiliation of the so-called "natural party of government"; | a scarcely less humiliating defeat for Labour, with Plaid Cymru beating it in a national election in Wales for the first time in nearly 100 years; and | within days, the sound of a dull thud as the Labour leadership in London and Cardiff finally falls off the tightrope of ambiguity to allow the party to become what the majority of its members have always wanted it to be, a party of Remain.
Ruth Davidson's optimistic, policy-rich conference speech, effectively firing the starting gun for Holyrood 2021, was followed at first minister's questions when Labour MSP Jenny Marr had Nicola Sturgeon reeling with an unanswerable attack on the state of education in Dundee, followed by Willie Rennie on her knee-jerk U-turn on airport tax and a masterclass defenestration of the SNP's 12 years in power.
We report a case of a 38-year-old woman who was admitted to our trauma centre following a suicide attempt by defenestration. On arrival at the triage zone, the patient was sedated and mechanically ventilated.
Corbyn's are as dangerous as May's But equally good was Tom Watson's defenestration of the PM.
They were documented to have killed the victims by charcoal burning, strangulation, mutilation, or defenestration. They all attempted suicide immediately after the killing and had histories of mental illness: paranoid schizophrenia (n = 2), severe depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms (n = 1), and recurrent depressive disorder (n = 1).
has been one of the #MeToo movement's most prominent success stories: the decisive defenestration of a known pervert whose comeuppance was long overdue.
I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror; victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival." That victory, as Charmley has pointed out, resulted in the dissolution of the British Empire, and more immediately, in Churchill's own defenestration by the war-weary British electorate in the elections of 1945.