coping

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cop·ing

 (kō′pĭng)
n.
The top layer or course of a masonry wall, usually having a slanting upper surface to shed water; a cope.

[From cope.]

coping

(ˈkəʊpɪŋ)
n
(Building) the sloping top course of a wall, usually made of masonry or brick. Also called: cope

cop•ing

(ˈkoʊ pɪŋ)

n.
1. a finishing or protective course or cap to an exterior masonry wall or the like.
2. a piece of woodwork having its end shaped to fit together with a molding.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coping - brick that is laid sideways at the top of a wallcoping - brick that is laid sideways at the top of a wall
brick - rectangular block of clay baked by the sun or in a kiln; used as a building or paving material
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
Translations

coping

[ˈkəʊpɪŋ]
A. N (Constr) → albardilla f, mojinete m
B. CPD coping stone N = copestone

coping

n (Archit) → Mauerkrone f

coping

:
coping saw
nLaubsäge f
coping stone
References in periodicals archive ?
Given that the RIM (Haase et al., 2017) provides an empirically derived and tested model predicting the family environment as a protective resource to manage illness, we discuss the results of this review in the context of the key risk, protective, and outcome factors identified in the RIM: Illness-Related Distress, Defensive Coping, Spiritual Perspective, Social Integration, Family and Courageous Coping, and Hope-Derived Meaning (Leeman, Sandelowski, Havill, & Knafl, 2015).
Defensive Coping Denial of guilt, Patients tend to cope Common factor self--blame, self by averting blame, aggrandizement.
While significant findings did not emerge for children, the authors conclude by stating that clinicians working with children with cancer and their parents should proceed with caution when interpreting assess-ments of adjustment of these individuals, particularly when they use a defensive coping style and have low levels of family support.