defensive medicine


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defensive medicine

n
(Medicine) the practice by a doctor of ordering extensive, often unnecessary tests in order to minimize liability if accused of negligence
Translations

de·fen·sive med·i·cine

n. medicina defensiva, medidas terapéuticas o de diagnóstico que se toman con el propósito de evitar un posible riesgo de negligencia médica.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is what people tend to anticipate as the impact of tort reforms on defensive medicine and is presumably why the expenditures are reduced among users of health care services in states with caps on attorney contingency fees, as we observed in the second part of the two-part model.
Critics argue that the system leads to the practice of defensive medicine and the overuse of tests and services.
Virtually all doctors practice defensive medicine, which has been defined as "deviation from sound medical practice that is induced primarily by a threat of liability.
If the tort system is operating as planned, slipshod care should be prevented and there should be almost no determinant to take on defensive medicine.
From exorbitant malpractice insurance premiums to the remarkably expensive practice of defensive medicine, it is my experience that the current culture of litigation costs patients hundreds of billions of dollars," Dr.
Defensive medicine is the lingering result of lawsuit fear, added Darren McKinney, director of communications at the American Tort Reform Association.
Indeed, massive cultural revolution, incentivizing a move away from blind defensive medicine, is needed to address a number of cascading key trigger points in support of appropriate imaging.
Controversy exists over whether defensive medicine is widely practiced and whether it raises health care costs.
Now, any attempts to loosen the rule will be seen as trying to practice defensive medicine.
And, if protected from medical liability, a majority of physician leaders believe they could save money for patients without compromising their quality and safety--a move that could help curtail the practice of defensive medicine.
Improving patient-provider communication across language barriers is proven to improve health outcomes, including lowering misdiagnoses and defensive medicine practices, and increasing treatment adherence rates.