definite article

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Related to definite articles: indefinite articles

definite article

n.
A member of the class of determiners that restricts or particularizes a noun. In English, the is the definite article.

definite article

n
(Grammar) grammar a determiner that expresses specificity of reference, such as the in English. Compare indefinite article

def′inite ar′ticle


n.
an article, as English the, that classes as identified or definite the noun it modifies.
[1755–65]

definite article

An article that specifies a noun; in English “the” is the definite article.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.definite article - a determiner (as `the' in English) that indicates specificity of reference
article - (grammar) a determiner that may indicate the specificity of reference of a noun phrase
Translations
أداة تَعْريف
člen určitýurčitý člen
bestemt artikel
määräinen artikkeli
határozott névelõhatározott névelő
ákveðinn greinirákveîni greinirinn
rodzajnik określony
določni člen
belirli harfi tarif

definite article

n (Gram) → bestimmter Artikel

definite article

n (Gram) → articolo determinativo

definite

(ˈdefinit) adjective
clear; fixed or certain. I'll give you a definite answer later.
ˈdefinitely adverb
clearly or certainly. She definitely said I wasn't to wait; Her dress is definitely not red.
definite article the name given to the word the
References in periodicals archive ?
As discussed earlier, demonstratives are the most common source from which definite articles or similar determiners of definiteness derive.
Western European languages usually express simple definiteness by means of definite articles.
Among the topics are typology and diachrony of partitive case markers, partitive noun phrases in the Estonian core argument system, dialectical variation in the definite articles and the partitive particle in Basque, the Russian partitive and verbal aspect, and the ancient Greek partitive genitive in typological perspective.
Among the topics are number and numberlessness in languages with and without articles, the Turkish noun phrase, reduced definite articles with restrictive relative clauses, the semantics and syntax of Japanese adnominal demonstratives, definiteness marking in modern Martinike, and acquiring the expression of genericity in English and Brazilian Portuguese.
To conclude, these results demonstrated that 30--and 36-month-olds can anticipate a target referent when previously exposed to definite articles for both gender-marked and unmarked target names.
In order to overcome one of the limitations acknowledged by the authors, namely, that the majority of their learners spoke Chinese, Korean and Japanese, East Asian languages that have no articles, Garcia Mayo selected EFL learners who were native speakers of Spanish, a language that "has definite articles with a similar semantic/pragmatic context of use to that of English for the four uses of the nongeneric definite article" (555).
Lipski (2006b) points out five features as quintessentials of Afro-Yungueno DP, which distinguish this dialect from other Spanish varieties: (a) lack of noun-adjective gender agreement; (b) invariant plurals, that is, no plural suffixes on nouns, adjectives, or determiners; (c) use of a single invariant plural definite article; (d) elimination of definite articles in generic constructions; (e) frequently, the retention of plural /s/ only on first element of plural DP.
In general, pronominal demonstratives grammaticalize into third person pronouns, relative pronouns, possessive markers, and sometimes into complementizers, while adnominal demonstratives tend to grammaticalize into definite articles and noun class markers.
Such an approach, for example, is more likely to stress the fact that the indefinite and the definite articles are substitutable for each other in certain generic contexts, while in nongenetic contexts they are never substitutable.
The difference between indefinite and definite articles provides a semantic entry point.
A chap called Quentin in the Daily Mail observed: "He kept adding unnecessary definite articles almost in the Gallic manner.
There are some grammatical constructions which require one or more definite articles.