deflour

de`flour´


v. t.1.Same as Deflower.
He died innocent and before the sweetness of his soul was defloured and ravished from him.
- Jer. Taylor.
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44) But the moral influence of the theater was debated widely in the period, and these disputations were exemplified in print by Philip Stubbes's railing against the "good examples to be learned" there: "if you will learne falshood, if you will learn cosenage: if you will learn to deceive: if you will learn to play the Hipocrit: to cogge, lye and falsifie: if you will learn to jest, laugh and [leer], to grin, to nodd, and mow: if you will learn to playe the vice, to swear, teare, and blaspleme, both Heaven and Earth: If you will learn to become abawde, uncleane, and to deverginat Mayds, to deflour honest Wyves: if you will learne to murther .