defoliation


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de·fo·li·ate

 (dē-fō′lē-āt′)
v. de·fo·li·at·ed, de·fo·li·at·ing, de·fo·li·ates
v.tr.
1. To deprive (a plant or a vegetated area, for example) of leaves.
2. To cause the leaves of (a plant or plants) to fall off, especially by the use of chemicals.
v.intr.
To lose foliage.

[Late Latin dēfoliāre, dēfoliāt- : Latin dē-, de- + Latin folium, leaf; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

de·fo′li·ate (-ĭt) adj.
de·fo′li·a′tion n.
de·fo′li·a′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defoliation - the loss of foliagedefoliation - the loss of foliage      
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.defoliation - causing the leaves of trees and other plants to fall off (as by the use of chemicals)
change of state - the act of changing something into something different in essential characteristics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

defoliation

[ˌdiːfəʊlɪˈeɪʃən] Ndefoliación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

defoliation

[diːˌfəʊliˈeɪʃən] n [area, plant] → défoliation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

defoliation

nEntlaubung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
(2008), defoliation consists of removing leaves to facilitate aeration and insolation in grape clusters to provide better conditions for maturation and reduction of diseases.
Tree defoliation data provided by European forest ecosystem monitoring networks have led to the publication of numerous studies conducted in various countries such as Finland (Nevalainen et al., 2010), France (Ferretti et al., 2014), Spain (De la Cruz et al., 2014), Italy (Pollastrini et al., 2016), and Lithuania (Augustaitis et al., 2018).
Educators and extension professionals can use "Soybean Rust: The Life Cycle of Phakopsora pachyrhizi" as a CD-Rom video tool to teach the complex life cycle of the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, an aggressive disease capable of causing defoliation and significant yield loss.
Influence of defoliation on overwintering carbohydrate reserves, return bloom, and yield of mature Chardonnay grapevines.
Causing greater concern in the gardening world is the blight fungus Cylindrocladium, which produces similar symptoms but leads to defoliation and death.
Despite the difficulty to precisely simulate natural defoliation caused by direct and/or indirect factors, the artificial cut of leaves is currently a useful method to measure to which extent the crop can withstand leaf area reduction, being used in many crops nowadays (Oyediran & Heinrichs, 2002; Lima Junior et al., 2010).
In his study, James shows that defoliation increases the risk of natural fires igniting eight to 10 years after a budworm outbreak - especially now, in the spring, before summer fire season starts.
In the Ribeira Valley, main producing region of banana of Sao Paulo State, defoliation is a cultural practice adopted for leaves with 50% of its area leaf taken by injuries caused by the Black Sigatoka, which helps to reduce fungal inoculum source (Mycosphaerella fijiensis) (MORAES et al., 2005).
This management is defined by the different components of the defoliation process of leaf blades: intensity and frequency.