defoul

defoul

(dɪˈfaʊl)
n
1. corruption; defilement
2. oppression
vb (tr)
3. to defile; soil
4. to trample upon; oppress
References in periodicals archive ?
(27) The author of the MS Bodley 423 copy specifically addresses the perils that the recluse may expect to face if she fails to control her tongue and takes an active interest in other people's doings: "but also the tunge is occupied alday, either aboute tidynges, curiously enquering and sechinge after hem, or elles of her neighbores yuel name, by way of bakbityng." (28) However, it is slander the author is worried about when he warns the recluse not to employ a female servant whose behavior could reflect badly upon the saintly status of the recluse herself: "lest thurgh hir wantownes and dissolucyon thyn holy temple be defouled and sclaundred." (29)
65 thilke that hast defouled thy soule, the temple of God.
More emphasizes Elizabeth Grey's widowhood as the basis for the Duchess of York's claim that marriage to her would be bigamous: More's Duchess tells Edward, "`wheras ye only widowhed of Elizabeth Gray though she wer in al other thinges conuenient for you, shold yet suffice as me semeth to refrain you from her mariage, sith it is an vnsitting thing, & a veri blemish, & highe disparagement, to the sacre magesty of a prince, y'ought as nigh to approche priesthode in clenes as he doth in dignitie, to be defouled [w.sub.t] bigamy in his first mariage'" (62).
During that time, they occasionally must be defouled"-raised from the ocean, rinsed and cleaned to remove barnacles, scallops or mussels that attach themselves to the oysters' shells.