defunct


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Related to defunct: defunct process

de·funct

 (dĭ-fŭngkt′)
adj.
Having ceased to exist or live: a defunct political organization.

[Latin dēfūnctus, past participle of dēfungī, to finish : dē-, de- + fungī, to perform.]

de·func′tive adj.
de·funct′ness n.

defunct

(dɪˈfʌŋkt)
adj
1. no longer living; dead or extinct
2. no longer operative or valid
[C16: from Latin dēfungī to discharge (one's obligations), die; see de-, function]
deˈfunctive adj
deˈfunctness n

de•funct

(dɪˈfʌŋkt)

adj.
1. no longer in effect or use: a defunct law.
2. no longer in existence; dead; extinct.
[1540–50; < Latin dēfunctus dead, past participle of dēfungī to bring to an end]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.defunct - no longer in force or use; inactive; "a defunct law"; "a defunct organization"
inoperative - not working or taking effect; "an inoperative law"
2.defunct - having ceased to exist or live; "the will of a defunct aunt"; "a defunct Indian tribe"
dead - no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life; "the nerve is dead"; "a dead pallor"; "he was marked as a dead man by the assassin"

defunct

adjective dead, extinct, gone, departed, expired, deceased, obsolete, bygone, nonexistent, not functioning, out of commission, inoperative the leader of the now defunct Social Democratic Party

defunct

adjective
2. No longer in use, force, or operation:
Translations

defunct

[dɪˈfʌŋkt] ADJ (frm)
1. [company, organization] → desaparecido, extinto; [idea] → caduco; [scheme] → paralizado, suspendido
2. (= deceased) → difunto

defunct

[dɪˈfʌŋkt] adj [organization] → défunt(e)

defunct

adj personverstorben; (fig) institution etceingegangen; ideauntergegangen; lawaußer Kraft

defunct

[dɪˈfʌŋkt] adj (company) → scomparso/a; (scheme) → morto/a e sepolto/a
References in classic literature ?
Belleforet, Father Le Juge, and Corrozet affirm that it was picked up on the morrow, with great pomp, by the clergy of the quarter, and borne to the treasury of the church of Saint Opportune, where the sacristan, even as late as 1789, earned a tolerably handsome revenue out of the great miracle of the Statue of the Virgin at the corner of the Rue Mauconseil, which had, by its mere presence, on the memorable night between the sixth and seventh of January, 1482, exorcised the defunct Eustache Moubon, who, in order to play a trick on the devil, had at his death maliciously concealed his soul in his straw pallet.
A whole fleet of copper-bottomed barques, as strong in rib and planking, as well-found in gear, as ever was sent upon the seas, manned by hardy crews and commanded by young masters, was engaged in that now long defunct trade.
In truth, it turned out to be one of those problematical whales that seem to dry up and die with a sort of prodigious dyspepsia, or indigestion; leaving their defunct bodies almost entirely bankrupt of anything like oil.
The earliest riser, coming forth in the dim twilight, would perceive a vaguely-defined figure aloft on the place of shame; and half-crazed betwixt alarm and curiosity, would go knocking from door to door, summoning all the people to behold the ghost -- as he needs must think it -- of some defunct transgressor.
During our expedition to Bethune the husband of my duchess died; so, my dear, the coffer of the defunct holding out its arms to me, I shall marry the widow.
Don't be afraid, Louise," said she; "monsieur will no more venture to take it hence than the defunct king Louis XIII.
They thought of all the affection they would have lavished on the defunct if they had known the end was so near.
You be twite dead, Dimmy, and I'll peep in and see 'em," one defunct innocent was heard to say.
The mantelpiece cast up a great black shadow, over half of a mouldy old sampler, which her defunct ladyship had worked, no doubt, and over two little family pictures of young lads, one in a college gown, and the other in a red jacket like a soldier.
He had left sundry folios, and certain boxes well stored with botanical specimens and defunct animals, under the good keeping of Ishmael, and it immediately struck his acute mind, that marauders as subtle as the Siouxes would never neglect the opportunity to despoil him of these treasures.
The brother and sister departed, and left Judge Pyncheon sitting in the old home of his forefathers, all by himself; so heavy and lumpish that we can liken him to nothing better than a defunct nightmare, which had perished in the midst of its wickedness, and left its flabby corpse on the breast of the tormented one, to be gotten rid of as it might!
Happy and fortunate were the times when that most daring knight Don Quixote of La Mancha was sent into the world; for by reason of his having formed a resolution so honourable as that of seeking to revive and restore to the world the long-lost and almost defunct order of knight-errantry, we now enjoy in this age of ours, so poor in light entertainment, not only the charm of his veracious history, but also of the tales and episodes contained in it which are, in a measure, no less pleasing, ingenious, and truthful, than the history itself; which, resuming its thread, carded, spun, and wound, relates that just as the curate was going to offer consolation to Cardenio, he was interrupted by a voice that fell upon his ear saying in plaintive tones: