defunct

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de·funct

 (dĭ-fŭngkt′)
adj.
Having ceased to exist or live: a defunct political organization.

[Latin dēfūnctus, past participle of dēfungī, to finish : dē-, de- + fungī, to perform.]

de·func′tive adj.
de·funct′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

defunct

(dɪˈfʌŋkt)
adj
1. no longer living; dead or extinct
2. no longer operative or valid
[C16: from Latin dēfungī to discharge (one's obligations), die; see de-, function]
deˈfunctive adj
deˈfunctness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•funct

(dɪˈfʌŋkt)

adj.
1. no longer in effect or use: a defunct law.
2. no longer in existence; dead; extinct.
[1540–50; < Latin dēfunctus dead, past participle of dēfungī to bring to an end]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.defunct - no longer in force or use; inactive; "a defunct law"; "a defunct organization"
inoperative - not working or taking effect; "an inoperative law"
2.defunct - having ceased to exist or live; "the will of a defunct aunt"; "a defunct Indian tribe"
dead - no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life; "the nerve is dead"; "a dead pallor"; "he was marked as a dead man by the assassin"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

defunct

adjective dead, extinct, gone, departed, expired, deceased, obsolete, bygone, nonexistent, not functioning, out of commission, inoperative the leader of the now defunct Social Democratic Party
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

defunct

adjective
2. No longer in use, force, or operation:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

defunct

[dɪˈfʌŋkt] ADJ (frm)
1. [company, organization] → desaparecido, extinto; [idea] → caduco; [scheme] → paralizado, suspendido
2. (= deceased) → difunto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

defunct

[dɪˈfʌŋkt] adj [organization] → défunt(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

defunct

adj personverstorben; (fig) institution etceingegangen; ideauntergegangen; lawaußer Kraft
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

defunct

[dɪˈfʌŋkt] adj (company) → scomparso/a; (scheme) → morto/a e sepolto/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Belleforet, Father Le Juge, and Corrozet affirm that it was picked up on the morrow, with great pomp, by the clergy of the quarter, and borne to the treasury of the church of Saint Opportune, where the sacristan, even as late as 1789, earned a tolerably handsome revenue out of the great miracle of the Statue of the Virgin at the corner of the Rue Mauconseil, which had, by its mere presence, on the memorable night between the sixth and seventh of January, 1482, exorcised the defunct Eustache Moubon, who, in order to play a trick on the devil, had at his death maliciously concealed his soul in his straw pallet.
A whole fleet of copper-bottomed barques, as strong in rib and planking, as well-found in gear, as ever was sent upon the seas, manned by hardy crews and commanded by young masters, was engaged in that now long defunct trade.
In truth, it turned out to be one of those problematical whales that seem to dry up and die with a sort of prodigious dyspepsia, or indigestion; leaving their defunct bodies almost entirely bankrupt of anything like oil.
The earliest riser, coming forth in the dim twilight, would perceive a vaguely-defined figure aloft on the place of shame; and half-crazed betwixt alarm and curiosity, would go knocking from door to door, summoning all the people to behold the ghost -- as he needs must think it -- of some defunct transgressor.