degender

de·gen·der

 (dē-jĕn′dər)
tr.v. de·gen·dered, de·gen·der·ing, de·gen·ders
To make gender-neutral, as by eliminating reference to gender or sex.

degender

(diːˈdʒɛndə)
vb
1. (intr) archaic to degenerate
2. (tr) to remove any reference to gender from (a document, etc)
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References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "We've made a conscious decision to degender stag and hen experiences and appeal to joint parties.
(2004:581) have noted, "women who have children stand at the nexus of [such] competing policy discourses", which gender or degender them according to current social or economic policy.
She argues that senior women can "degender" masculine strategies by showing them to be "tools of leadership" rather than innate gender capacities.
To make otherness a position from which she can speak requires that she either contend with and radically alter the received tradition--as, in different ways do Dickinson and Rich--or that she degender her voice--as do Moore and Bishop.
A broader and more systematic framework is developed in Mona Harrington's Care and Equality, which reflects a burgeoning progressive effort to rethink, degender, and redesign the social organization of care.
Beginning with a discussion of attempts by slaveowners to "degender" African women, Patton asserts that slave women drew upon the practices of traditional matrifocal African societies and the labor demands of slaveowners to reconstruct gender roles so that African American women were considered mothers, and thus women.
All one had to do was to "degender" Justine: to make her sex irrelevant to determination of the hockey team on which she played.
Though in general agreement with the project of the NRSV, he wonders whether the "attempt to 'degender' passages that were originally meant to refer to men and not to women is not to distort the text."
In fact, one of the great contributions of nickelodeons was to degender the poorest people's attendance, as the cheap prices completed the process of incorporating women and children proportionally into the working-class audience.
As Melman admits, Edwards's lack of interest in playing the traditional female role of healer and sympathizer--a part Edwards's friend Lucy did play in Egypt by dispensing medicines, especially gallons of rosewater, to the many people who trusted foreigners more than their own doctors--may have been part of Edwards's strategy to "degender her narrative" and thereby allow her to focus on her archaeological interests and observations.
This, it should be emphasized, in no way minimizes or exculpates the appalling incidence of violence against women, and it certainly does not seek to "degender" the problem of domestic violence (Berns, 2001).
Unfortunately, the bullying focus may serve to both degender the problem of sexual harassment and sexual violence and to take attention away from the increasing severity of these problems.