degender

(redirected from degendered)

de·gen·der

 (dē-jĕn′dər)
tr.v. de·gen·dered, de·gen·der·ing, de·gen·ders
To make gender-neutral, as by eliminating reference to gender or sex.

degender

(diːˈdʒɛndə)
vb
1. (intr) archaic to degenerate
2. (tr) to remove any reference to gender from (a document, etc)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Shanghai, Spring 1930 has often been read as a key text marking Ding's shift from focusing on the sexual-romantic desires and psychology of the educated urban New Woman and Modern Girl to a more typically degendered and masculinized leftist aesthetic (see e.
It was here, in his intransigence, that Dubuffet arrived at his radical reimagining of figuration, conceiving the figure in terms of generic corporeality--depersonalized, and even degendered.
Together, feminists across the class spectrum," writes Chappell, "offered a vision of a new, degendered family wage, challenging the male-breadwinner bias that continued to inform liberal policy prescriptions.
9) In order to stimulate gender equality in both the workplace and the home, (10) parental leave--not just parental leave legislation--must be degendered, so that procreation results in neither negative employment ramifications for women nor decreased familial opportunities for men.
Nevertheless, there do remain a number of obstacles in the way of a truly degendered society, and one of the more intractable of these lies in the fundamental dilemma of balancing home and work, the domestic and the economic, of succeeding both as a home-maker and as a career-woman.
Although MacGregor rejects degendered notions of "care" and "nurture" as means to recreate social relations to nature, she otherwise stops short of setting forth a comprehensive feminist theory of ecological citizenship.
Outwardly, these aggressive postmodern women have degendered themselves, and thus escaped from traditional male stereotypes of what is female.
deracinated, degendered view of intellectual products and markets fails
Bruggarf contends that the reallocation of time in a degendered work force produces great pressures insofar as "many of the efficiencies of gender specialization that once formed the base of the family economy have lost their economic value," while "degenderization of [public] economic production roles has put stress on the caring functions of the family for which there are no technological substitutes" (The Feminine Economy 19, emphasis in original).
She sees paradoxes in gender as currently expressed, from the strategies of feminist politics to the atrocities practiced by terrorists, and finds much to commend about a completely degendered society, including a number of advantages for those who once thought of themselves as strictly male or female and acted accordingly.
Consequently, neo-liberalism seeks to turn poor mothers into degendered workers who do not receive provisions for child care and who must work to reform themselves.