degender

(redirected from degendering)

de·gen·der

 (dē-jĕn′dər)
tr.v. de·gen·dered, de·gen·der·ing, de·gen·ders
To make gender-neutral, as by eliminating reference to gender or sex.

degender

(diːˈdʒɛndə)
vb
1. (intr) archaic to degenerate
2. (tr) to remove any reference to gender from (a document, etc)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The latter Glenn sees as characterizing the Scandinavian countries; while they have not succeeded in degendering caring work they have encouraged some shifting between women and men.
Ariel Ayarma, From Children's Interests to Parental Responsibility: Degendering Parenthood Through Custodial Obligation, 19 UCLA WOMEN'S L.
At a bureaucratic level, Brady's (2011: 278) analysis of official WTW discourse revealed a degendering of paid work as official programs provide 'little guidance on how mothering practices .
37) Emily Jackson, Degendering Reproduction, 16 MED.
Degendering and regendering: Recomposing masculinities through anti-sexist masculinity projects.
Svetlana Peshkova in her ethnographic research on women leaders in the Ferghana Valley in Uzbekistan sets the tone by degendering the desire for leadership by claiming that it is "culturally and historically" determined.
amp; POL'Y 17 (2004) (arguing the Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") has granted women job security, but has been unsuccessful in degendering parental leave).
122) By degendering game theory, he elevates play--and not simply in an ironic, burlesque way--as an authentic arena of ingegno, and he promotes the discourse on play as a legitimate topic of philosophical debate.
Deterritorializing desire, degendering, regendering, in odd and upside-down ways (just one example: the way Clark turned the idea of the wedding totally on its head in I Do, so that the whole thing becomes about the impossibility of such a union of two).
Breaking the Bowls: Degendering and Feminist Change.
Breaking the bowls; degendering and feminist change.
Davis finds that as early as the Declaration of Sentiments composed after the women's convention at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848, other American feminists were abandoning one of Fuller's most radical moves: her degendering of the female body and redefinition of woman as "soul.