deglaciation


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de·gla·ci·a·tion

 (dē-glā′shē-ā′shən, -sē-)
n.
The uncovering of glaciated land because of melting or sublimation of the glacier.

deglaciation

(diːˌɡleɪsɪˈeɪʃən)
n
the process of removing glaciation

de·gla·ci·a·tion

(dē-glā′shē-ā′shən)
The uncovering of land because of the melting of a glacier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two modern dating methods (OSL and [sup.10]Be) recently used could not help to improve the existing Late-glacial stratigraphical chart of Estonia (Raukas & Kajak 1995) and deglaciation chronology in the northern Baltic area.
The depositional history begins, therefore, at the earliest possible time following the earliest deglaciation of Michigan.
Radiocarbon dates for the lowest levels of the Crooked Lake core seem unreasonably old ([greater than]10,000 BP) given the date of deglaciation at Sylvania as indicated by our Glimmerglass Lake data and by the results of Davis et al.
Deglaciation of the Erie-Ontario Lowland was completed between 14000 and 12000 yr BP (Teller 1987).
The late Wisconsin glaciation and deglaciation of the Laurentine ice sheet.
They found that the organisms are consuming more than 99 percent of the methane, so they "may mitigate the release of methane to the atmosphere upon subglacial water drainage to ice sheet margins and during periods of deglaciation."
It has been assumed that the long and thin lobes of fastflowing ice streams between the Gulf of Finland and the LGM position in the study area became detached from the SIS during deglaciation (Demidov et al.
Instead, the researchers used a high throughput next generation DNA sequencing approach called pyrosequencing to look for the overall plankton changes in the Back Sea from the deglaciation to recent times.
However, the fossil horse cranium (CMN 43815) radiocarbon-dated to ~16000 14C yr BP (RIDDL-765, RIDDL-766) and collected from a probable in situ context may provide a minimum age for deglaciation of the Herschel Island ice-thrust ridge.
Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating has enabled us to make profound advances regarding the nature and timing of deglaciation and the extent of ice cover in Atlantic Canada.
Since deglaciation, the land has risen considerably and the carvings are now about 12 metres above sea level.
Glaciofluvial ice-contact stratified drift and ablation moraine are limited mainly to valleys, indicating that ice lobes remained in the area during deglaciation, with rapid flow and melting (of the ice sheet) facilitated by sea-water flooding of low-lying valleys.