deid


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deid

(diːd)
adj
a Scot word for dead
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"And, now" says he, "mind I have my blunderbush, and if ye take a step nearer ye're as good as deid."
His "[s]en scho is deid, I speik of hir no moir" (Testament, 1.616) brings to mind Kermode's statement: "It is one of the great charms of books that they have to end" (Kermode 2000: 23).
O quha is this has don this deid, This ill deid don to me; To send me out this time o' the yeir, To sail upon the se?
(3) It should be noted, however, that, in general, these exceptions are not present in Scots, so that the examples above are heid, deid and weill, all pronounced with /i(:)/.
A lass raxed oot for the list, to read-"Weel, wounded, missin' - DEID": An the war was by for twa.
Damn few and they're a' deid!" We had the famous tea towel when I was a kid, so doing the dishes helped educate me about all the things that Scots had invented.
It's funny having the opportunity to look back on your life when you're not deid. Cat was a right laugh but maybe not the full shilling.
He said, 'Move and you're deid.'" The witness said the man pointed a "black automatic" gun at him.
In it, he sings a Hoops fan chant about him: "Oh John Guidetti, puts the ball in the netty, he's a Super Swede and the huns are deid, walking in Guidetti wonderland."
Entitled Rhyw Deid yn Dod Miwn which translates as Some Tide Coming In and published in 2008, the book was based on Hughes' breathtaking images.
"Ye canna have Goudie," she said, "he's deid, but Harrison's living yet." And he made the boots.