deism


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de·ism

 (dē′ĭz′əm, dā′-)
n.
A religious belief holding that God created the universe and established rationally comprehensible moral and natural laws but does not intervene in human affairs through miracles or supernatural revelation.

[French déisme, from Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

de′ist n.
de·is′tic adj.
de·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

deism

(ˈdiːɪzəm; ˈdeɪ-)
n
(Theology) belief in the existence of God based solely on natural reason, without reference to revelation. Compare theism
[C17: from French déisme, from Latin deus god]
ˈdeist n, adj
deˈistic, deˈistical adj
deˈistically adv

de•ism

(ˈdi ɪz əm)

n.
belief in the existence of a God on the evidence of reason and nature, with rejection of supernatural revelation.
[1675–85; < French déisme < Latin de(us) god + French -isme -ism]
de′ist, n.
de•is′tic, de•is′ti•cal, adj.
de•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

deism

the acknowledgment of the existence of a god upon the testimony of reason and of nature and its laws, and the rejection of the possibility of supernatural intervention in human affairs and of special revelation. — deist, n.deistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deism - the form of theological rationalism that believes in God on the basis of reason without reference to revelation
rationalism - the theological doctrine that human reason rather than divine revelation establishes religious truth
Translations
deismus
deisme
deism
deismi
דאיזם
deizam
deisme
deizm
deism
deism
自然神論

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm] Ndeísmo m

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm ˈdeɪɪzəm] ndéisme m

deism

nDeismus m
References in classic literature ?
He was also younger brother of Lord Edward Herbert of Cherbury, an inveterate duellist and the father of English Deism.
We can, however, confidently say that English deism and what some call the "German classic philosophy" (2) that began with Kant and passed by way of Hegel and Schleiermacher before reaching Marx and Nietzsche, are among those currents of thought that have significantly contributed to that vision, especially when it comes to contemporary perceptions of religion.
Deism, the religious expression of the new Enlightenment, was a powerful influence on the leading people of England and America in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
Jefferson spoke in a May 5, 1817, letter of "true religion" as based on "moral precepts, innate in man," and the "sublime doctrine of philanthropism and deism taught us by Jesus of Nazareth.
If man has not a free will, then the Machiavellians are justified, as are Calvinism, Rationalism, Deism, Capitalism, and Communism.
While too few in number of make statistical generalizations, Latinos also mentioned practicing Hinduism, Taoism, paganism, Satanism, spiritualism, deism, mixed traditions and Native American spiritual traditions.
The former is not a Christian or even a theistic God, yet deism is extremely tempting because it fits so nicely the naturalism of psychology: God created the order of the world that psychologists investigate, but God is no longer involved in the world (naturalism), and psychologists do not need to take divine influences into account in their theories, methods, and practices.
Thus any absolutism the state might impose on the clergy is no different from the absolute truth of the Deism Mendelssohn already assumes.
Yet his Deism had been the legacy of his freethinking Jesuit teachers at his elite Parisian lycee, not of his fellow philosophes.
Many of our country's Founding Fathers accepted only Deism, the belief that God may have created the world, but then it was on its own, mirroring Isaac Newton's notion of the world as a giant clock, given an initial one-time windup by Deity.
Rustow traced this viewpoint to deism and beyond it to a mystical pre-Socratic Greek belief in a harmonious universe.
To support his contention, Ruderman explores the topics of Bible translation, Hebrew language study, Deism, radical politics, contemporary science and, finally, Jewish translation, in each case demonstrating how the Jewish response to the national debate reflected a far greater degree of engagement than Jewish historians have heretofore believed.