del Sarto


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del Sarto

(Italian dɛl ˈsarto)
n
(Biography) See Sarto
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

del Sar•to

(dɛl ˈsɑr toʊ)
n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Andrea del Sarto glorified his princes in pictures that must save them for ever from the oblivion they merited, and they let him starve.
Andrea del Sarto, Fra Lippo Lippi, Cleon, Karshish, Balaustion, and many scores of others, make of his poems a great gallery of portraits unsurpassed in interest by those of any author whatever except Shakspere.
"I fear," said Trefusis, repressing himself and speaking quietly again, "that when a Socialist hears of a hundred pounds paid for a drawing which Andrea del Sarto was glad to sell for tenpence, his heart is not wrung with pity for the artist's imaginary loss as that of a modern capitalist is.
Directors of this kind are very rare [...] To me, such [directors] seem in a way like Andrea del Sarto, the celebrated Florentine painter [...] Cousser was to the highest degree just such a musical Sarto.
Del Sarto, Israel under siege: the politics of insecurity and the rise of the Israeli neorevisionist right (Washington DC: Georgetown University Press, 2017).
Returning from her daytime trip to the Prado as a "boy," she boasts to David that she is proud she can do their "night things" in the day and toyingly asks if he loves her more than "that Andrea del Sarto girl" he used to love.
Welu, then chief curator, attributed a painting of St John the Baptist in a local church to Andrea del Sarto (Fig.
"Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, or what's a heaven for?" wrote Robert Browning in his poem "Andrea del Sarto." It's one of the most famous quotes not to come from the Bible, Homer or Shakespeare, and it means we must seek to find the limits of our talent and drive if we are to achieve all that we are capable of.
The pair, based on portraits by Italian artists Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530) and Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (1727-1804), merge into a mass of swirling lines.
Julian Brooks; ANDREA DEL SARTO; Getty Publications (Nonfiction: Art) 59.00 ISBN: 9781606064382