delate

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Also found in: Legal.
Related to delators: maiestas

delate

(dɪˈleɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) (formerly) to bring a charge against; denounce; impeach
2. (Law) rare to report (an offence, etc)
3. (Broadcasting) obsolete to make known or public
[C16: from Latin dēlātus, from dēferre to bring down, report, indict, from de- + ferre to bear]
deˈlation n
deˈlator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

delate


Past participle: delated
Gerund: delating

Imperative
delate
delate
Present
I delate
you delate
he/she/it delates
we delate
you delate
they delate
Preterite
I delated
you delated
he/she/it delated
we delated
you delated
they delated
Present Continuous
I am delating
you are delating
he/she/it is delating
we are delating
you are delating
they are delating
Present Perfect
I have delated
you have delated
he/she/it has delated
we have delated
you have delated
they have delated
Past Continuous
I was delating
you were delating
he/she/it was delating
we were delating
you were delating
they were delating
Past Perfect
I had delated
you had delated
he/she/it had delated
we had delated
you had delated
they had delated
Future
I will delate
you will delate
he/she/it will delate
we will delate
you will delate
they will delate
Future Perfect
I will have delated
you will have delated
he/she/it will have delated
we will have delated
you will have delated
they will have delated
Future Continuous
I will be delating
you will be delating
he/she/it will be delating
we will be delating
you will be delating
they will be delating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been delating
you have been delating
he/she/it has been delating
we have been delating
you have been delating
they have been delating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been delating
you will have been delating
he/she/it will have been delating
we will have been delating
you will have been delating
they will have been delating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been delating
you had been delating
he/she/it had been delating
we had been delating
you had been delating
they had been delating
Conditional
I would delate
you would delate
he/she/it would delate
we would delate
you would delate
they would delate
Past Conditional
I would have delated
you would have delated
he/she/it would have delated
we would have delated
you would have delated
they would have delated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
References in periodicals archive ?
The final loop in the Augustan intelligence dragnet was his employment of a cadre of professional snoops called delators ("denouncers").
Often--and this again sounds all too close to home--the delatores would offer financial reward to confidential informants with information worth (or not worth) purchasing.
The delatores, possessed of information they gathered personally or from their paid informants, would present this evidence at trials, surprising the accused by rehearsing often word-for-word conversations the participants thought they were carrying on in private.
If Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who revealed the level of NSA spying on Americans, knows his Roman history, he must feel especially simpatico with those caught in the snare of the delatores.
Conquest adds that "after Morosov, a whole cycle of delators of mothers and fathers was celebrated in the Soviet Press, and entered in the Pioneer 'Book of Honour.'"
(62) Levick, 189 (noting that "Delators were hated under the Principate").
At first glance, the historian gives the impression that during Tiberius' reign the use of delatores was a unique phenomenon, whose central objective was to spitefully accuse others in the interest of profit, power and personal gain.
Historians described it as "the crime of acting with malice towards the Roman people." (11) At the time, it was developed as a civil action through which plaintiffs, or delatores (who were often ordinary citizens), would come forth and accuse an individual of malicious conduct.
According to my 11th edition Britannica, the common informers or delators of ancient Rome were a class of private citizens who specialized in bringing accusations against others: "They were drawn from all classes of society - patricians, knights, freedmen, slaves, philosophers, literary men, and, above all, lawyers." The right to file charges against a fellow citizen was not in itself new, but took on a new character when the state began awarding the delator a share of the property of the accused; a successful accusation of treason, for example, carried as a prize a quarter of the victim's estate.
If the delator lost his case or refused to carry it through, he was liable to the same penalties as the accused." But since our legal system sedulously resists a loser-pays principle for accusers, we avoid even this much of a prospective downside.
And if his utterances over a sundowner glass of South African wine have been reported to Rome, this can only indicate delators at work, as unreliable as they are despicable.