deliberatively


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to deliberatively: deliberately

de·lib·er·a·tive

 (dĭ-lĭb′ə-rā′tĭv, -ər-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Assembled or organized for deliberation or debate: a deliberative legislature.
2. Characterized by or for use in deliberation or debate.

de·lib′er·a′tive·ly adv.
de·lib′er·a′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
McKeown learned through experience (making career decisions by default rather than deliberatively) that "when we surrender our ability to choose, something or someone else will step in to choose for us" (loc.
DPA Taipei Democracy advocates meeting in Taiwan on Sunday highlighted the need to amplify unheard voices and rescue materials about the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, saying the Chinese regime has deliberatively distorted facts about the event.
At this moment, the agent gains a new choice, a new freedom, to act deliberatively. The final stage of this development occurs when one takes up freedom as an imperative.
Also, the Fed was presided over by a board of governors, which supposedly made decisions deliberatively and independent of all political or private financial interests that might be brought to bear.
Whatever Rousseau actually meant by the general will, his phrase captures the idea of civic Republicanism that by reasoning deliberatively together, we can unify ourselves collectively in consensus.
Conversely, this ideal of self-government might just as easily be seen as evolutionarily linked first with a mode of legal experience that emphasizes the centrality of deliberatively created law (i.e.
The second truth is even more important: In the height of the digital media heyday, we find our clients slowly but deliberatively returning to "pre-internet" behaviors.
He said he deliberatively skipped the NYSC scheme because he was convinced that his membership of the state assembly was itself a 'service.'
(6) That political pressure is described as being "populist" in origin, which might reflect something "democratic," though unlikely "deliberatively democratic." Perhaps a sustained deliberative process over weeks or months by a representative group of British citizens would have yielded the same outcome, though the discussion below provides reasons for thinking otherwise.
Bridges of trust and confidence that have been burnt down consciously or unconsciously must be speedily and deliberatively reconstructed.