deliberative

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de·lib·er·a·tive

 (dĭ-lĭb′ə-rā′tĭv, -ər-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Assembled or organized for deliberation or debate: a deliberative legislature.
2. Characterized by or for use in deliberation or debate.

de·lib′er·a′tive·ly adv.
de·lib′er·a′tive·ness n.

deliberative

(dɪˈlɪbərətɪv)
adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) involved in, organized for, or having the function of deliberating: a deliberative assembly.
2. characterized by or resulting from deliberation: a deliberative conclusion.
deˈliberatively adv
deˈliberativeness n

de•lib•er•a•tive

(dɪˈlɪb ər ə tɪv, -əˌreɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. having the function of deliberating, as a legislative assembly.
2. dealing with the wisdom and expediency of a proposal: a deliberative speech.
[1545–55; < Latin]
de•lib′er•a•tive•ly, adv.
de•lib′er•a•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.deliberative - involved in or characterized by deliberation and discussion and examination; "a deliberative body"
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"

deliberative

adjective
Of, characterized by, or disposed to thought:
Idiom: in a brown study.
Translations

deliberative

[dɪˈɪbərətɪv] ADJdeliberativo

deliberative

[dɪˈlɪbərətɪv] adj [institution, procedure] → délibérant(e)

deliberative

adj speechabwägend; deliberative bodyBeratungsorgan nt; deliberative assemblyberatende Versammlung; deliberative processBeratungsprozess m

deliberative

[dɪˈlɪbrətɪv] adj (assembly) → con potere deliberante
References in periodicals archive ?
deliberativeness, and (in the argot of the time (96)) the public
Conversely, Hadley questions how extreme forms of direct action such as threats and property damage could ever be justifiable and constitute 'deliberativeness' further down the line (2015).
However, the more important issue is the degree of deliberativeness that can be discerned across all powerful institutions in a polity (not just those explicitly designed to serve a deliberative function) and among the citizenry.
(4) This core body of law is frequently credited with performing the functions of constitutional law, (5) but with an extra kick that the Madisonian blueprint lacks--the bonuses of efficiency, deliberativeness, and transparency.
In the Australian Democratic Audit, the authors expand the original two values by adding a third value--the quality of public debate and discussion ('deliberativeness') (Sawer, Abjorensen and Larkin, 2009).
Abbott, who took office in January, has nonetheless approached the situation with his trademark deliberativeness, perhaps heightened by the fact it is unlike anything he has confronted so far in his short time as governor, aides say.
Various formulations of the duty of care in private law enjoin the fiduciary to act with the attentiveness and deliberativeness of a "reasonable," "ordinary," or "prudent" person, but the content of this duty varies with the circumstances.
Some studies have expanded the deliberative ideal by including conflict-oriented discussion modes (Dahlberg 2007), some have made the ideal less rigorous, for example by assessing as deliberative all postings referring to other postings (Ulrich 2005b), or less absolute, by assessing the deliberativeness of online debates on a scale ranging from truly deliberative to non-deliberative (Strandberg 2008).
The goals reflect a priority for managing the allocation of resources through process values of accountability and deliberativeness. (49) These values and assumptions are carried forward in the PPACA concept of reform.
The following imagines what an effective unicameral legislature might look like in Alaska--a chamber of sixty members elected to four year terms with increased procedure designed to ensure the body's deliberativeness. It then considers the reasons why Alaskans should adopt such a system and why they should be hesitant to adopt a unicameral.
In this respect, incomplete borrowing aligns with the judicial instincts of incrementalism and deliberativeness, rule-of-law values that help to promote a sense, if not always the reality, of stability.
Former campaign manager Mark Salter defended the press strategy by saying: "We felt it necessary to adopt the same deliberativeness and discipline employed by our opponents and rely less on impromptu press conferences with our travelling press, and more on interviews arranged in advance so our candidates would have the same opportunity our opponents enjoyed to discuss and prepare for the interview."