delightedly


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de·light·ed

 (dĭ-lī′tĭd)
adj.
1. Filled with delight.
2. Obsolete Delightful.

de·light′ed·ly adv.
de·light′ed·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.delightedly - with delight; "delightedly, she accepted the invitation"
Translations

delightedly

[dɪˈlaɪtɪdlɪ] ADVcon alegría
she smiled delightedlysonrió encantada, sonrió contentísima

delightedly

[dɪˈlaɪtɪdli] adv [say, exclaim] → d'un ton satisfait
to smile delightedly → sourire d'aise
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Nicholas saw that Denisov was refusing though he smiled delightedly. He ran up to them.
"We'll collaborate," cried Owen delightedly. "You will give the soul and I the body.
"Eh!" said Martha delightedly, "that was nice of him wasn't it?"
"Good afternoon, noble parent!" he cried, delightedly." I'm glad to see you are here.
Hilda looked up delightedly at the tall gray figure beside her.
"Good!" cried Dorothy, clapping her hands delightedly. "That was the way the Magic Carpet took us across.
They laughed delightedly and scampered off a short distance, calling out over their shoulders to her.
The rustle of the poplar leaves about the house worried her, it sounded so like pattering raindrops, and the full, faraway roar of the gulf, to which she listened delightedly at other times, loving its strange, sonorous, haunting rhythm, now seemed like a prophecy of storm and disaster to a small maiden who particularly wanted a fine day.
"I'm glad I was stung by the wasps after all," she said delightedly. "If I hadn't been ma would never have let me eat with you.
'You will not!' cried she, delightedly. 'Accept my sincere thanks, then!'
When he saw me draw back, he began to crow delightedly, `Hoo, hoo-hoo, hoo-hoo!' like a rooster.
"You'd better b'lieve your uncle Jerry don't propose to leave till he gits this thing fixed up," cried the old man delightedly. "Now you've had all you can stan' to-night, poor little soul, without gettin' a fit o' sickness; an' Mirandy'll be sore an' cross an' in no condition for argyment; so my plan is jest this: to drive you over to the brick house in my top buggy; to have you set back in the corner, an' I git out an' go to the side door; an' when I git your aunt Mirandy 'n' aunt Jane out int' the shed to plan for a load o' wood I'm goin' to have hauled there this week, you'll slip out o' the buggy and go upstairs to bed.