demagogue

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dem·a·gogue

also dem·a·gog (dĕm′ə-gôg′, -gŏg′)
n.
1. A leader who obtains power by means of impassioned appeals to the emotions and prejudices of the populace.
2. A leader of the common people in ancient times.
v. dem·a·gogued, dem·a·gogu·ing, dem·a·gogues also dem·a·goged , dem·a·go·ging , dem·a·goges
v. tr.
Usage Problem To speak about (an issue, for example) in the manner of a demagogue.
v. intr.
Usage Problem To speak in the manner of a demagogue.

[Greek dēmagōgos, popular leader : dēmos, people; see dā- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + agōgos, leading (from agein, to lead; see ag- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]
Usage Note: Even though demagogue has been used as a verb meaning "to speak about something with the tactics of a demagogue" since the 1600s, the verb has kept a low profile in the language. The Usage Panel does not view the verb with much favor in either its transitive or intransitive use. In our 2016 survey, between 85 and 89 percent of the Usage Panel rejected it in a range of intransitive and transitive examples. These results are only slightly more favorable than when this issue was last balloted, nearly two decades earlier. Perhaps this continued resistance should not be surprising, since the use of familiar nouns as verbs is often the subject of complaints.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

demagogue

(ˈdɛməˌɡɒɡ) or

demagog

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political agitator who appeals with crude oratory to the prejudice and passions of the mob
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in the ancient world) any popular political leader or orator
[C17: from Greek dēmagōgos people's leader, from dēmos people + agein to lead]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dem•a•gogue

or dem•a•gog

(ˈdɛm əˌgɒg, -ˌgɔg)

n., v. -gogued, -gogu•ing. n.
1. a person, esp. a political leader, who gains power by arousing people's emotions and prejudices.
2. (in ancient times) a leader of the people.
v.i.
3. to speak or act like a demagogue.
[1640–50; < Greek dēmagōgós=dêm(os) people + agōgós guiding]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

demagogue

A person who gains the support of the public by making impassioned speeches that appeal to their emotions and prejudices.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demagogue - a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular passions and prejudices
pol, political leader, politico, politician - a person active in party politics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

demagogue

noun agitator, firebrand, haranguer, rabble-rouser, soapbox orator He was dismissed as a radical demagogue.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
demagog
扇動
demagog

demagogue

demagog (US sometimes) [ˈdeməgɒ>g] Ndemagogo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

demagogue

[ˈdɛməgɒg] ndémagogue mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

demagogue

, (US) demagog
nDemagoge m, → Demagogin f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

demagogue

[ˈdɛməgɒg] n (pej) → demagogo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
To be sure, the demagoguing is bipartisan; if one major party is bad, the other is worse.
The talk is not about "New Democrats" anymore, and no one is demagoguing on the race issue (e.g., Sister Souljah) the way Clinton did.
In Mississippi not long ago a trial lawyer demagoguing against rich foreign companies got a jury to vote $500 million against a Vancouver-based funeral home chain in a routine commercial dispute; the Loewen Corporation later settled for more than $100 million.