demeane

demeane

(dɪˈmeɪn)
n
1. (Law) another word for demesne
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another word for demesne
vb (tr)
an archaic spelling of demean2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how Bookes demeane
The interest formerly held by Lucy Peighen's sister Elizabeth in these properties is mentioned, but Alice Hilton's is not: "Witnesseth that wher Elizabeth Cholmeley late wife of Ranulphe Cholmeley late Recorder of London esquier was in her lif tyme by good conveyaunce in Law lawfully seased in her Demeane as of freehold for terme of her naturall lif of and in two ten[eme]nts and four messuages with thappurtenances sett lyinge and being in the parish of St.
(10) In Areopagitica, published in November of 1644, Milton himself makes a connection-albeit a punning one--between meaning and prison when he writes, "I deny not, but that it is of greatest concernment in the Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how Bookes demeane themselves well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors." The Works of John Milton, 18 vols.