demeanour


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to demeanour: thesaurus

demeanour

(dɪˈmiːnə) or

demeanor

n
1. the way a person behaves towards others; conduct
2. bearing, appearance, or mien
[C15: see demean2]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demeanour - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other peopledemeanour - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
manners - social deportment; "he has the manners of a pig"
citizenship - conduct as a citizen; "award for good citizenship"
swashbuckling - flamboyantly reckless and boastful behavior
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
improperness, impropriety - an improper demeanor
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

demeanour

U.S. demeanor
noun behaviour, air, bearing, conduct, manner, carriage, deportment, mien, comportment her calm and cheerful demeanour
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
سُلوك، تَصَرُّف
chovánívystupovánízpůsoby
holdningopførseloptræden
hegîun
izturēšanāsuzvešanās

demeanour

demeanor (US) [dɪˈmiːnəʳ] Nconducta f, comportamiento m; (= bearing) → porte m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

demeanour

[dɪˈmiːnər] (British) demeanor (US) n
(= way of behaving) → comportement m
(= appearance) → maintien m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

demeanour

, (US) demeanor
n (= behaviour)Benehmen nt, → Auftreten nt; (= bearing)Haltung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

demeanour

demeanor (Am) [dɪˈmiːnəʳ] n (frm) → contegno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

demeanour

(dimiːnə) (American) demeanor noun
manner; bearing; the way one behaves.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Methinks there's a genius Roams in the mountains, Girdled with ivy And robed in wisteria, Lips ever smiling, Of noble demeanour, Driving the yellow pard, Tiger-attended, Couched in a chariot With banners of cassia, Cloaked with the orchid, And crowned with azaleas; Culling the perfume Of sweet flowers, he leaves In the heart a dream-blossom, Memory haunting.
Whenever she went out -- and compassion for her misadventure made her friends eager to entertain her -- she bore a demeanour that was perfect.
With sly gravity, interrupted only by private signs to each other, the Norman knights and nobles beheld the ruder demeanour of Athelstane and Cedric at a banquet, to the form and fashion of which they were unaccustomed.
``Insult?'' answered Prince John, resuming his courtesy of demeanour; ``I trust it will not be thought that I could mean, or permit any, to be offered in my presence.
For a long time Pelet bore with my frigid demeanour very patiently; he even increased his attentions; but finding that even a cringing politeness failed to thaw or move me, he at last altered too; in his turn he cooled; his invitations ceased; his countenance became suspicious and overcast, and I read in the perplexed yet brooding aspect of his brow, a constant examination and comparison of premises, and an anxious endeavour to draw thence some explanatory inference.
Next day, when I saw the directress, and when she made an excuse to meet me in the corridor, and besought my notice by a demeanour and look subdued to Helot humility, I could not love, I could scarcely pity her.
Likewise he is a good, disinterested soul, and one that is not over-talkative, though a true bear in appearance and demeanour. Industrious, and possessed of a handwriting purely English, his caligraphy is, it must be confessed, even worse than my own.
She contented herself by preserving a solemn and stony silence, when in company of Pitt and his rebellious wife, and by frightening the children in the nursery by the ghastly gloom of her demeanour. Only a very faint bending of the head-dress and plumes welcomed Rawdon and his wife, as those prodigals returned to their family.
A woman or two, and three or four undertaker's men, the best whom Southampton could furnish, dressed in black, and of a proper stealthy and tragical demeanour, had charge of the remains which they watched turn about, having the housekeeper's room for their place of rendezvous when off duty, where they played at cards in privacy and drank their beer.
In which case, if you had raised your eyes to the mirror, you would certainly have observed a marked increase of gloom in the demeanour of the young man attending to your apex.
I never saw her, but I have heard good as well as evil respecting her; and I imagine that, though cold and haughty in her general demeanour, and even exacting in her requirements, she has strong affections for those who can reach them; and, though so blindly attached to her son, she is not without good principles, or incapable of hearing reason.
In either case, there was very much the same solemnity of demeanour on the part of the spectators, as befitted a people among whom religion and law were almost identical, and in whose character both were so thoroughly interfused, that the mildest and severest acts of public discipline were alike made venerable and awful.