demean

(redirected from demeans)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to demeans: belittles, contributes

de·mean 1

 (dĭ-mēn′)
tr.v. de·meaned, de·mean·ing, de·means
To conduct or behave (oneself) in a particular manner: demeaned themselves well in class.

[Middle English demeinen, to govern, from Old French demener : de-, de- + mener, to conduct (from Latin mināre, to drive (animals), from minārī, to threaten, from minae, threats; see men- in Indo-European roots).]

de·mean 2

 (dĭ-mēn′)
tr.v. de·meaned, de·mean·ing, de·means
To lower in status or character; degrade or humble: professionals who feel demeaned by unskilled work. See Synonyms at debase.

[de- + mean.]

de·mean′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

demean

(dɪˈmiːn)
vb
(tr) to lower (oneself) in dignity, status, or character; humble; debase
[C17: see de-, mean2; on the model of debase]

demean

(dɪˈmiːn)
vb
(tr) rare to behave or conduct (oneself) in a specified way
[C13: from Old French demener, from de- + mener to lead, drive, from Latin mināre to drive (animals), from minārī to use threats]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•mean1

(dɪˈmin)

v.t.
to lower in dignity or standing; debase.
[1595–1605; de- + mean2, modeled on debase]

de•mean2

(dɪˈmin)

v.t.
to conduct or behave (oneself) in a specified manner.
[1250–1300; Middle English deme(i)nen < Anglo-French, Old French demener=de- de- + mener to lead, conduct < Latin mināre to drive, minārī to threaten]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

demean


Past participle: demeaned
Gerund: demeaning

Imperative
demean
demean
Present
I demean
you demean
he/she/it demeans
we demean
you demean
they demean
Preterite
I demeaned
you demeaned
he/she/it demeaned
we demeaned
you demeaned
they demeaned
Present Continuous
I am demeaning
you are demeaning
he/she/it is demeaning
we are demeaning
you are demeaning
they are demeaning
Present Perfect
I have demeaned
you have demeaned
he/she/it has demeaned
we have demeaned
you have demeaned
they have demeaned
Past Continuous
I was demeaning
you were demeaning
he/she/it was demeaning
we were demeaning
you were demeaning
they were demeaning
Past Perfect
I had demeaned
you had demeaned
he/she/it had demeaned
we had demeaned
you had demeaned
they had demeaned
Future
I will demean
you will demean
he/she/it will demean
we will demean
you will demean
they will demean
Future Perfect
I will have demeaned
you will have demeaned
he/she/it will have demeaned
we will have demeaned
you will have demeaned
they will have demeaned
Future Continuous
I will be demeaning
you will be demeaning
he/she/it will be demeaning
we will be demeaning
you will be demeaning
they will be demeaning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been demeaning
you have been demeaning
he/she/it has been demeaning
we have been demeaning
you have been demeaning
they have been demeaning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been demeaning
you will have been demeaning
he/she/it will have been demeaning
we will have been demeaning
you will have been demeaning
they will have been demeaning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been demeaning
you had been demeaning
he/she/it had been demeaning
we had been demeaning
you had been demeaning
they had been demeaning
Conditional
I would demean
you would demean
he/she/it would demean
we would demean
you would demean
they would demean
Past Conditional
I would have demeaned
you would have demeaned
he/she/it would have demeaned
we would have demeaned
you would have demeaned
they would have demeaned
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.demean - reduce in worth or character, usually verbally; "She tends to put down younger women colleagues"; "His critics took him down after the lecture"
abase, chagrin, humiliate, humble, mortify - cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of; "He humiliated his colleague by criticising him in front of the boss"
reduce - lower in grade or rank or force somebody into an undignified situation; "She reduced her niece to a servant"
dehumanise, dehumanize - deprive of human qualities; "Life in poverty has dehumanized them"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

demean

verb degrade, lower, debase, humble, abase Pornography demeans women.
demean yourself lower yourself, humiliate yourself, humble yourself, debase yourself, downgrade yourself, abase yourself, belittle yourself, degrade yourself I wasn't going to demean myself by answering him.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

demean 1

verb
To conduct oneself in a specified way:

demean 2

verb
1. To deprive of esteem, self-worth, or effectiveness:
Idioms: bring low, take down a peg.
2. To lower in character or quality:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

demean

[dɪˈmiːn] VTdegradar
to demean o.srebajarse, degradarse
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

demean

[dɪˈmiːn] vt (= degrade) to demean o.s. → s'abaisser
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

demean

vr
(= lower)sich erniedrigen; I will not demean myself by doing thatich werde mich nicht dazu hergeben, das zu tun
(= behave)sich benehmen or verhalten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

demean

[dɪˈmiːn] vtsvilire
to demean o.s → abbassarsi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
During this performance, the hermit demeaned himself much like a first-rate critic of the present day at a new opera.
Here Don Quixote joined them; and learning what passed, and how soon Sancho was to go to his government, he with the duke's permission took him by the hand, and retired to his room with him for the purpose of giving him advice as to how he was to demean himself in his office.
Bennet.'-- My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, whose bounty and beneficence has preferred me to the valuable rectory of this parish, where it shall be my earnest endeavour to demean myself with grateful respect towards her Ladyship, and be ever ready to perform those rites and ceremonies which are instituted by the Church of England.
Balashev began to feel uncomfortable: as envoy he feared to demean his dignity and felt the necessity of replying; but, as a man, he shrank before the transport of groundless wrath that had evidently seized Napoleon.
"Did she not break into lamentation and woe that a brother should so demean himself?"
And here we'll stay, To mark him how he doth demean himself.
Osborne withdrew his account from Bullock and Hulker's, went on 'Change with a horsewhip which he swore he would lay across the back of a certain scoundrel that should be nameless, and demeaned himself in his usual violent manner.
My situations is lowly, and my capacities is limited, and my duties is to humble myself afore the base degenerating daughters of their blessed mothers as is--fit to keep companies with holy saints but is born to persecutions from wicked relations--and to demean myself before them as is no better than Infidels--an't it, miss!
One who has reached my years, and who has a name for wisdom, ought not to demean himself.
I admit that I am a spy, and that it is considered a discreditable station--though it must be filled by somebody; but this gentleman is no spy, and why should he so demean himself as to make himself one?"
To my shame be it said, I had thought at first of nothing but the part that I was to play, of my own cleverness, of how I should demean myself; but now that I was in the country, an ominous thought flashed through my soul like a thunderbolt tearing its way through a veil of gray cloud.
"One of the candidates has said they would not take the salary - that demeans the office of president.