dementia


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Related to dementia: senile dementia

de·men·tia

 (dĭ-mĕn′shə)
n.
Loss of cognitive abilities, including memory, concentration, communication, planning, and abstract thinking, resulting from brain injury or from a disease such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. It is sometimes accompanied by emotional disturbance and personality changes.

[Latin dēmentia, madness, from dēmēns, dēment-, senseless; see dement.]

de·men′tial adj.

dementia

(dɪˈmɛnʃə; -ʃɪə)
n
(Pathology) a state of serious emotional and mental deterioration, of organic or functional origin
[C19: from Latin: madness; see dement]

de•men•tia

(dɪˈmɛn ʃə, -ʃi ə)

n.
severely impaired memory and reasoning ability, usu. with disturbed behavior, associated with damaged brain tissue.
[1800–10; < Latin dēmentia madness <dē- de- + mēns mind + -ia -ia]
de•men′tial, adj.

dementia

madness or insanity. Cf. amentia.
See also: Insanity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dementia - mental deterioration of organic or functional origin
insanity - relatively permanent disorder of the mind
alcohol amnestic disorder, alcoholic dementia, Korsakoff's psychosis, Korsakoff's syndrome, Korsakov's psychosis, Korsakov's syndrome, polyneuritic psychosis - dementia observed during the last stages of severe chronic alcoholism; involves loss of memory for recent events although long term memory is intact
presenile dementia - dementia with onset before the age of 65
senile dementia, senile psychosis - dementia of the aged; results from degeneration of the brain in the absence of cerebrovascular disease

dementia

noun
Serious mental illness or disorder impairing a person's capacity to function normally and safely:
Psychiatry: mania.
Psychology: aberration, alienation.
Translations
demence
demens
dementia
demencijasilpnaprotystė
demens

dementia

[dɪˈmenʃɪə] Ndemencia f
senile dementiademencia f senil

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃiə dɪˈmɛnʃə] ndémence fdemerara sugar [ˌdɛmərɛərəˈʃʊgər] (British) nsucre m roux, cassonade f

dementia

nSchwachsinn m, → Demenz f (spec); dementia praecoxJugendirresein nt, → Dementia praecox f (spec)

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃɪə] n (Med) → demenza

de·men·ti·a

n. demencia, locura; declinación de las funciones mentales;
___ paralytica___ paralítica;
___ praecox___ precoz, esquizofrenia;
organic ______ orgánica;
senile ______ senil.

dementia

n demencia; Alzheimer’s — demencia de Alzheimer, demencia tipo Alzheimer; — pugilistica demencia pugilística; multi-infarct — (ant) demencia vascular, demencia multiinfarto (ant); vascular — demencia vascular
References in classic literature ?
When there is no punishment at all, crime will either cease to exist, or, if it occurs, will be treated by physicians as a very distressing form of dementia, to be cured by care and kindness.
His concluding smile was positively ghastly, and his eyes had resumed something more than their old restlessness; they shifted hither and thither about the room with apparent aimlessness and I fancied had taken on a wild expression, such as is sometimes observed in cases of dementia.
38-9), imbecility and dementia still have to be considered physiologically, as caused by defects in the brain.
With an ageing population, the number of people with dementia is set to grow, so too will the costs.
Nearly 47 million people worldwide are estimated to have dementia in 2015--a number expected to nearly double every 20 years, according to a recent global report.
PEOPLE across the North East are being invited to attend free events aimed at increasing dementia awareness in the region.
HYDERABAD -- Short-term memory is the most common early symptom of dementia and an estimated 18 million people globally are infected with this disease.
13, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The International Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners, based in New Jersey, United States of America, has partnered with Relias Learning to set up an all-new online training portal for international health care professionals seeking certification in the area of dementia care.
WASHINGTON -- A 7-minute screening tool nearly doubled the rate at which primary care physicians could identify elderly patients in their practices with dementia in a German study involving more than 6,800 community-dwelling people.
ON behalf of Jesmond Dementia Action Alliance I would like to thank Beryl Downing for so generously sharing the experience that she and her husband Tony had in living with dementia "Life is worth living: how one North East family coped with a diagnosis of dementia, Journal, August 13.
Further presentations from specialist architects, nurses and occupational therapists as well as dementia experts from housing, local authorities and care homes
According to the World Alzheimer's Report 2014, released recently by Alzheimer's Disease International in New Zealand, certain key lifestyle changes can help reduce the risk of developing dementia.